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Old 11-20-2022, 12:10 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Jim34RL View Post
To me being cheap and not wanting batteries to go bad due to wintertime storage in a trailer. It is simply to remove the battery and bring it home. No big deal to me.
I don't know where people get the idea that cold temperatures are bad for battery STORAGE. The opposite is true, up to a point. The issue for a lead/acid battery is freezing the liquid. A fully charged battery with normal acid level will not freeze until temperature gets well below -40F. Self discharge slows as the temperatures drop. In a "temperate" climate self discharge gets faster as the temperature rises. At +50F a maintainer may well be required for longer term storage.
According to US Army COE: "Batteries should be stored in a cold place, say, about -15C, although when fully charged to a specific gravity of 1.280 or greater they can be stored at -1C indefinitely without deteriorating."
Full document for the quote is called "a239115.pdf" and can be found online. Document title is "Cold Regions Technical Digest No. 91-4, May 1991 Automotive Batteries at Low Temperatures". To find look for the .pdf file not the document title.
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Old 11-20-2022, 01:30 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by SailorSam20500 View Post
I don't know where people get the idea that cold temperatures are bad for battery STORAGE. The opposite is true, up to a point. The issue for a lead/acid battery is freezing the liquid. A fully charged battery with normal acid level will not freeze until temperature gets well below -40F. Self discharge slows as the temperatures drop. In a "temperate" climate self discharge gets faster as the temperature rises. At +50F a maintainer may well be required for longer term storage.
According to US Army COE: "Batteries should be stored in a cold place, say, about -15C, although when fully charged to a specific gravity of 1.280 or greater they can be stored at -1C indefinitely without deteriorating."
Full document for the quote is called "a239115.pdf" and can be found online. Document title is "Cold Regions Technical Digest No. 91-4, May 1991 Automotive Batteries at Low Temperatures". To find look for the .pdf file not the document title.
Thanks for posting a detailed explanation, and referencing the COE document (which I am familiar with). Maybe continuing to preach it will eventually get some people off of the old bring-it-in-a-warm-area-for-winter-storage idea, and save them some trouble. In addition, their batteries may even last longer.
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Old 11-21-2022, 07:10 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by MacRoo23 View Post
Hey all... next question for my new '23 233s... regarding Battery Winterizing

I have the double solar panels on the roof and a single battery(non-lithium) - both stock from the factory/dealer.

I will be storing the ROO offsite, but outside & uncovered

For the winter should I:

A. Leave it all be... let the solar keep the battery charged (turn everything off inside)
B. Flip the Battery disconnect switch and walk away
C. Disconnect the Battery and remove to store on a trickle-charger
D. Some other option i havnt thought of...

Thanks again,
Safest thing to do is remove battery and put on a trickle charger. You dont have to worry as much about theft, and battery will be fully charged.
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Old 11-21-2022, 08:22 PM   #24
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I'm with option C. Been doing that for years with both the camper and motorcycle. No worries that way. Trickle charge initially in warm indoors, then take off of charger. Reconnect to maintainer about every 2 months for 24 -48 hrs, and again just prior to putting back in service. Batteries have always gone past their life expectancy with this method.
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Old 11-21-2022, 08:42 PM   #25
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Safest thing to do is remove battery and put on a trickle charger. You dont have to worry as much about theft, and battery will be fully charged.
To my way of thinking, the only reason for removing L/A batteries is if you are worried about theft, more so if trailer is in an open storage lot. But then again, what about your TV, other stuff in the RV, and for class A's and C's, the catalytic converter...
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Old 11-22-2022, 10:48 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by SailorSam20500 View Post
I don't know where people get the idea that cold temperatures are bad for battery STORAGE. The opposite is true, up to a point. The issue for a lead/acid battery is freezing the liquid. A fully charged battery with normal acid level will not freeze until temperature gets well below -40F. Self discharge slows as the temperatures drop. In a "temperate" climate self discharge gets faster as the temperature rises. At +50F a maintainer may well be required for longer term storage.
According to US Army COE: "Batteries should be stored in a cold place, say, about -15C, although when fully charged to a specific gravity of 1.280 or greater they can be stored at -1C indefinitely without deteriorating."
Full document for the quote is called "a239115.pdf" and can be found online. Document title is "Cold Regions Technical Digest No. 91-4, May 1991 Automotive Batteries at Low Temperatures". To find look for the .pdf file not the document title.
First off how do you know that your battery is fully charged when you put your trailer to bed in the winter?

Such as this year for an example I winterized my trailer in a RV resort. My last steps were to bring the slides in and raised the hydraulic leveling legs. I than removed the power cord from the power pedestal putting this away. The battery was then disconnected from the power draining parasitic's of the trailer.

As I always due I used a multi meter to check the battery voltage, this was down to 12.2 volts. To me this is not fully charge battery thus as I said I always bring the battery home. If I so choose to take the time, I could charge the battery with a battery charger. But this takes time, and we were ready to drive home from our resort that we stay at in the camping season.
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Old 11-22-2022, 11:34 AM   #27
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First off how do you know that your battery is fully charged when you put your trailer to bed in the winter?

Such as this year for an example I winterized my trailer in a RV resort. My last steps were to bring the slides in and raised the hydraulic leveling legs. I than removed the power cord from the power pedestal putting this away. The battery was then disconnected from the power draining parasitic's of the trailer.

As I always due I used a multi meter to check the battery voltage, this was down to 12.2 volts. To me this is not fully charge battery thus as I said I always bring the battery home. If I so choose to take the time, I could charge the battery with a battery charger. But this takes time, and we were ready to drive home from our resort that we stay at in the camping season.
If after just disconnecting the shore power and hence the converter charger, a lead acid battery with resting voltage of only 12.2 volts would seem to be in need of replacement.
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Old 11-22-2022, 11:45 AM   #28
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If after just disconnecting the shore power and hence the converter charger, a lead acid battery with resting voltage of only 12.2 volts would seem to be in need of replacement.
Exactly. 12.2 is around 60%. Not good if all you did was bring in slides and levelers while it was still plugged into shore power.
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Old 11-22-2022, 12:30 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Jim34RL View Post
First off how do you know that your battery is fully charged when you put your trailer to bed in the winter?

Most accurate way, after letting the battery rest a day after last time it was charging, check the specific gravity of the electrolyte. Second best, again after letting the battery rest, check the voltage.
If your battery is down to 12.2 volts after that little use, especially if still connected to shore power, it's time to look into replacing it. I'd also check the converter to insure it is functioning properly.
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Old 11-22-2022, 03:06 PM   #30
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We pretty much go "glamping" so we tend to camp at full service spots. We do this mostly because of extended stays, so no solar and a single deep cycle battery for all the 12 volt stuff. We did upgrade to the largest deep cycle batter we could get. When the trailer goes into Winter Storage that battery is removed and stored in our basement on a wood shelf until it's needed again in the spring. We are on our 4th travel trailer and this system has never let us down.
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Old 11-22-2022, 04:03 PM   #31
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I use a single solar panel to keep lead acid batteries up in the winter. If the weather gets stormy I put the panel in the trailer.
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Old 11-23-2022, 11:23 AM   #32
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Exactly. 12.2 is around 60%. Not good if all you did was bring in slides and levelers while it was still plugged into shore power.
Not really. When my wife and I are winterizing the trailer, she is inside with the12V lights on as I was draining the water. She is removing all food products and cleaning out the trailer. Remember I was winterizing so, the 12V water pump was also on there are a lot of patristic losses to the battery that the converter/inverts cannot make up in a short time period.

I have the low voltage happen on my other 5th wheel trailer when I was winterizing the trailer. And thus, I have learned to check the battery voltage as my last thing I do before I leave the trailer for winter. To me it is very simple to remove the battery and bring the battery home. The battery rides in its own plastic battery box and is strap in the back of the pick-up bed.

To me this is easier than finding a failed battery for any issue come spring.
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Old 11-23-2022, 11:31 AM   #33
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Most accurate way, after letting the battery rest a day after last time it was charging, check the specific gravity of the electrolyte.
True this works the best. But why would I drive back to the trailer to the check the battery state. This at least a three- and half-hour one way drive around the lake MI thru IN traffic on I80/I90/I94 roadways. It is simpler to bring the battery home and put on a trickle charger till spring.
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