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Old 08-24-2019, 08:01 AM   #41
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If you are in an area that requires any electrical work be done or approved by electrcian you can at times find an electrician at home development sites that will do some after hours work.
They can give you a list of materials to get at HD that way all tgey have to do is the labor. Some will even drop by when their day is finished to scope the job, quote their price and give you a bill of materials.
Lots of folks in our development got extra plumbing, electrical, masonry done this way. And they all like to pick up extra tax free money.
One guy had the worker come by do the work, then his boss came by to inspect and sign off. Boss believed in heping his workers out.
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Old 08-24-2019, 08:34 AM   #42
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Living in Florida, we wanted to keep the AC on in the TT (set to 80) to keep humidity down.

I put a post in the ground near the trailer, installed the 30A box, buried ~100' of underground rated wire, and wired the box. I'm not a fan of working in the main box with the box hot so I had an electrician install the breaker end (after he inspected my work). Materials: ~$100, mostly for the wire. Paid labor: $125.

When I get ambitious, I'll run water out there, more to have a short hose run for washing than connecting to the TT.
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Old 08-24-2019, 08:59 AM   #43
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30A inside garage on wall. No weather proof box needed.

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Old 08-24-2019, 04:49 PM   #44
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I would do the same if the trailer was anywhere near the garage.
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30A inside garage on wall. No weather proof box needed.

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Old 08-24-2019, 05:43 PM   #45
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I wanted to wire for the future so I purchased a RV 50 amp box (check with Home Depot) and only used a 30 amp breaker to feed it. I use a 50 to 30 dogbone to hook up my 30 amp camper but when I purchase a 5th wheel next year I will just replace the 30 amp breaker with a 50 and be ready to go. BTW make sure you use at least #6 wire.
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:13 AM   #46
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I have a 30 amp RV receptacle at home for my trailer. It is plugged in 24/7 when not camping.
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Old 08-26-2019, 06:35 PM   #47
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Lots of folks have RV receptacles at home- both 30A and 50A.

One VERY STRONG WARNING--- it's a common MISTAKE that even licensed electricians make all the time.
A home RV 120 volt 30 Amp socket is very similar to the old fashioned 3 prong
240 Volt dryer socket. So similar that they get confused all the time.
If you plug your 30 A RV into a Dryer socket it WILL burn out a LOT of expensive stuff in your brand new trailer.
Make SURE your electrician knows that a 30 Amp RV socket is 120 Volts NOT 240!!

As far as cost is concerned I doubt you can get a licensed electrician to do it for $200. It totally depends on how far the RV outlet is from your home main panel.
A 120v 30Amp RV plug will not go into a 240v 30Amp outlet. Just sayin...
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Old 08-26-2019, 06:44 PM   #48
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I installed a 30 amp outlet on the side of my main breaker panel located on the side of the house. Fortunately it is very close to my driveway allowing me to plug motorhome in and get refrigerator cooled down I also run ac while loading and unloading. The total cost of materials purchased at Lowes was about 45.00 including weatherproof box and cover. A very worthwhile investment.
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Old 08-26-2019, 06:52 PM   #49
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Has anyone installed a 30 amp plug at home (if you keep your rig parked at home) for true shore power?

I keep a battery tender hooked up to my battery when we're parked at home. A couple of days before we leave on a trip, I disconnect the battery tender and use a dog leg to plug into a "regular" 110 outlet at my garage. I turn on the fridges, set the clocks on the microwave and stereo, and generally get stuff ready. The problem is, when we're getting ready to go or working inside our rig, it can get really hot. When we turn on the AC, it will run for a minute or two and then the GFCI on our garage outlet will trip. The rig is drawing too much juice. We want to be able to run the AC when we're tinkering inside or getting ready to go. Also, my teenagers like to hang out with friends and watch a movie in the rig when the cover is not on. They can't do that when the weather is warm.

Has anyone had an electrician install a 30 or 50 amp plug? Was it cost prohibitive? It it's more than a couple of hundred bucks I don't want to do it. I'm not experienced enough in electrical to do it myself.
What is on that circuit in the garage that you just added a 12/13 amp load to? If it is a 15 amp breaker It will not hold the start up current of the A/C. It must be a 20 amp circuit. Turn off the GFI circuit in the RV.
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:13 PM   #50
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I've had two installed in different homes. ALWAYS have the 120/240 discussion with the electrician. Both of mine had RVs and knew of cases where "helpers" wired for 240.
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:29 PM   #51
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I installed my own. The run was about 70 feet from main power panel to where the RV box was installed on the out side of the house.

Not a big deal really. Slipped in a new breaker in the main panel, ran the wire (proper size), installed the outside box, wired the receptical in the box, connected wire to the breaker in the main panel and whooohoo, all good to go.

Nope, not an electrician - just followed the instructions in a how to electrician manual. :-)
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:30 PM   #52
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I installed 30 amp myself after watching a video on YouTube. Must make sure receptacle is TT wired. Also, the breaker box switch must be compatible with the breaker box. You canít just use any switch. Cost maybe $100 and my time. I can run the a/c and not blow switches. It also cut the electric bill a tad because it isnít drawing as much power as it did through smaller plug
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:34 PM   #53
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I have a 110vac, 20 amp outlet in my garage close to where my TT is parked. The 20 amp outlet is on it's own 20A circuit breaker and has #12 wire run to it. I use a 110vac to 220vac (trailer) pigtail adapter plugged into the 110vac, 20amp outlet. It runs everything in the TT, including my A/C. Cutting the microwave on at the same time as the A/C will trip the breaker. But I only use it on trips. At home the battery charges and the A/C runs OK.
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:45 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by Rwgrigg View Post
I have a 110vac, 20 amp outlet in my garage close to where my TT is parked. The 20 amp outlet is on it's own 20A circuit breaker and has #12 wire run to it. I use a 110vac to 220vac (trailer) pigtail adapter plugged into the 110vac, 20amp outlet. It runs everything in the TT, including my A/C. Cutting the microwave on at the same time as the A/C will trip the breaker. But I only use it on trips. At home the battery charges and the A/C runs OK.
"110vac to 220vac (trailer) pigtail adapter"?
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:54 PM   #55
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Adding a breaker

Amperage is only part of the issue in tripping the breaker. The other is the GFCI. A GFCI is intended for resistive (lights, etc) loads, not inductive (motor) loads. No matter what size GFCI breaker you have, a motor load will eventually trip it. Donít try a freezer or refrigerator on a GFCI Breaker.

The cost of adding the 30 or 50 amp service depends on a lot of variables. Age of the power panel, distance of outlet from power panel, etc.

FYI- Home Depot sells RV power plug boxes (50 & 30
Amp) that are ready to mount for about $50. The breaker itself will cost you $25-30 bucks. Now you just need experienced labor. I did my own ( wire included) for less than $100 and in about 1 hour. Hope this helps
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:02 PM   #56
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It was pretty easy to wire up a 120V, 50A circuit.
Follow the directions on the plug package AND CHECK THE VOLTAGE! Buy a good multimeter if you don't have one. Mine is a Fluke with a thermocouple for temp sensing as well. Worth the money vs. a cheap analog model.

BTW I also wired up a 220, 30A receptacle for my Bolt electric car. Again, no big deal, just pay attention to what is hot, neutral and ground. Or look online. The Chevy salesman seemed to be amazed.
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:10 PM   #57
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I use a Camco 15A male to 30A female adapter. You can find them at most RV dealers or online. The 15A male plugs into the 20A, 110vac outlet. I wouldn't plug it into a 15A outlet because the wiring (#14 usually) is not big enough. The 30A female is on the normal TT electical cable opposite from the trailer power hookup end.
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:11 PM   #58
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50 amp at home

I put in a 50 amp at home. Parts cost about $75. If you have an electrician do it cost would probably be $300-$500. Get two or three estimates. Expect 30 amp would cost about same.
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:21 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rwgrigg View Post
I use a Camco 15A male to 30A female adapter. You can find them at most RV dealers or online. The 15A male plugs into the 20A, 110vac outlet. I wouldn't plug it into a 15A outlet because the wiring (#14 usually) is not big enough. The 30A female is on the normal TT electical cable opposite from the trailer power hookup end.
I think Slow Moon is asking why you're referring to any of this as 220vac.
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:24 PM   #60
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It was pretty easy to wire up a 120V, 50A circuit.
Follow the directions on the plug package AND CHECK THE VOLTAGE! Buy a good multimeter if you don't have one. Mine is a Fluke with a thermocouple for temp sensing as well. Worth the money vs. a cheap analog model.

BTW I also wired up a 220, 30A receptacle for my Bolt electric car. Again, no big deal, just pay attention to what is hot, neutral and ground. Or look online. The Chevy salesman seemed to be amazed.
Most 50a circuits are 240 v. The inverter takes care of the voltage. But, if you only wire a 30 amp, make sure it is 120v
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