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Old 08-27-2019, 09:21 PM   #101
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Well, the code was written with personal safety in mind, and this item is essential for personal safety when using high amp electrical service in an outdoors location.....
I have worked at a ACE hardware for 10 years, and I work at a Lowe’s. I have a working relationship with a number of professionals from plumbers to electricians and more that spans well over a decade. I have talked to quite a number of “do it myselfers” who want to “save a buck” , which is great... if you know what you are doing...! For those who are doing electrical work, I ask if this one item is included in their list of items to buy. I have had a few people ask me “what is that?”
My response is: If you do not know what “that” is and what it does, you should NOT be doing this project.
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Old 08-27-2019, 09:33 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by Villagerjjm View Post
Well, the code was written with personal safety in mind, and this item is essential for personal safety when using high amp electrical service in an outdoors location.....
I have worked at a ACE hardware for 10 years, and I work at a Lowe’s. I have a working relationship with a number of professionals from plumbers to electricians and more that spans well over a decade. I have talked to quite a number of “do it myselfers” who want to “save a buck” , which is great... if you know what you are doing...! For those who are doing electrical work, I ask if this one item is included in their list of items to buy. I have had a few people ask me “what is that?”
My response is: If you do not know what “that” is and what it does, you should NOT be doing this project.
Ooooooh, "THAT"!! Why didn't you say so?
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Old 08-28-2019, 06:36 AM   #103
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Originally Posted by Villagerjjm View Post
Well, the code was written with personal safety in mind, and this item is essential for personal safety when using high amp electrical service in an outdoors location.....
I have worked at a ACE hardware for 10 years, and I work at a Lowe’s. I have a working relationship with a number of professionals from plumbers to electricians and more that spans well over a decade. I have talked to quite a number of “do it myselfers” who want to “save a buck” , which is great... if you know what you are doing...! For those who are doing electrical work, I ask if this one item is included in their list of items to buy. I have had a few people ask me “what is that?”
My response is: If you do not know what “that” is and what it does, you should NOT be doing this project.
While a number of items might qualify, I'm guessing that you're referring to a grounding rod. I'd also suggest a properly installed surge protective device such as the Intermatic IG series, IG1240RC3.
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:22 AM   #104
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Lots of folks have RV receptacles at home- both 30A and 50A.

One VERY STRONG WARNING--- it's a common MISTAKE that even licensed electricians make all the time.
A home RV 120 volt 30 Amp socket is very similar to the old fashioned 3 prong
240 Volt dryer socket. So similar that they get confused all the time.
If you plug your 30 A RV into a Dryer socket it WILL burn out a LOT of expensive stuff in your brand new trailer.
Make SURE your electrician knows that a 30 Amp RV socket is 120 Volts NOT 240!!

As far as cost is concerned I doubt you can get a licensed electrician to do it for $200. It totally depends on how far the RV outlet is from your home main panel.
I'd be looking for a qualified electrician, and any damages to my equipment, because they wired something up wrong would go back to them. Every receptacle comes with a stamped rating on it, and instructions. If they can't follow them, I'd find a new one..

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Depending on the distance, the cost of materials could run a couple hundred.

The farther from the panel the larger the wire size required. I installed my own (grew up on a farm and learned enough about electricity to do it myself and even pass inspection) and have 3 #6 awg conductors in conduit running to my pad. Total run is around 80-90 feet (i forget). When I park I plug into a 30 amp receptacle on a post and can run EVERYTHING in my TT from this with voltage on the power panel showing nothing less than 119 volts.

I did the "extension cord" trick for too many years and after burning the ends off a few, and having to reset breakers I said "No More".

As for getting an electrician, shop around. Many qualified individuals are in business for themselves and don't charge as much as the "Yellow Page Companies".

In my state a homeowner can do his own electrical work and only has to purchase a "Safe Wiring Sticker" from local building department. When work is done they'll inspect and either show where corrections are needed or give you their blessing and leave. You do, however, need to know what you're doing with electricity. It's not all that hard as the basics are a lot like plumbing for water. Difference being a "leak" won't just make things wet, it could knock one on their keister or create a lot of smoke (with fire at it's worst).
All I can say here is wow.. You did get the part about the further away from the panel the larger the wire will need to be. The install you did may have passed, but you wasted money on that size of wire. At 90' and 24 amps (80% of 30) #8's would give you about a 2.2% voltage drop. Yes it is only one size, but it also impacts the conduit size, and whether the wires will fit properly when terminated in the box and on the device.
Comparing electrical to plumbing, you missed the part where electrical can kill you and burn things down if done wrong.. And part of doing it wrong is a loose connection..

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Originally Posted by CedarCreekWoody View Post
To the OP, you may find that if you turn off the breaker to the GFCI outlet in you trailer that you can run on the garage outlet without tripping the garage GFCI.
There is this neat document called the National Electrical Code (or the Canadian Electrical Code in Canada) that you may wanna look at before recommending goofy advice like this.. Ground Fault receptacles are installed for a reason, not typically at a whim...


To the OP, hire a qualified electrician. Get the permit. Ask them to show you the voltages when they are done! Personally, I'd ask to see all 3, and if they say it's ok, tell them that's fine, but you as the paying customer have the right to see it, it isn't a secret and they should have nothing to hide if it's done right...
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:55 AM   #105
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A 30 or 50 amp RV/Marine outlet does not require a GFCI and installing one there may cause problems with the GFCI in the RV.

Good article here. (This is a link.)

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Old 08-28-2019, 08:06 AM   #106
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correct, and that's why you don't see any 30amp or 50amp outlets for RVs at campsites with a GFCI receptacle, even if there is such a thing.

also, I think that while we can mull over this 'installation' issue, most folks aren't going to do it 'themselves' and are typically going to ask an electrician to handle it, which is where the problem can show itself, the 'assumption' by the electrician that 30amp RV service is the 'same' as the typical and more common 30amp Dryer service in most households.
With that said, even if the service is installed incorrectly, the plug end should not allow your camper to plug into it, as it would/should be different. Of course, the electrician could then simply change out the plug for the correct one, but then the service would still be incorrect, as the wiring would still be for 240v service - not good.

We have to be clear on our needs, and let the professional know that we need 120v RV service, not 240v dryer service.
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Old 08-28-2019, 08:32 AM   #107
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CedarCreekWoody
To the OP, you may find that if you turn off the breaker to the GFCI outlet in you trailer that you can run on the garage outlet without tripping the garage GFCI.
Quote:
Originally Posted by glen1971 View Post

There is this neat document called the National Electrical Code (or the Canadian Electrical Code in Canada) that you may wanna look at before recommending goofy advice like this.. Ground Fault receptacles are installed for a reason, not typically at a whim...
Glen,
Maybe you misunderstood Woody's suggestion of turning off the GFCI breaker in the R/V when plugging into a feed that is also a GFCI? (such as a garage)

It is a known fact that two GFCI in series do not play well with each other.
If you take the downstream GFCI out of the equation,(in the R/V) then the GFCI supplying the current (in the garage) won't falsely trip. That is not goofy advice.

By disabling the R/Vs GFCI by tripping the breaker, you disable the entire circuitry of that GFCI outlet (and any outlets downstream) and pose no code violations or shock hazards whatsoever.
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Old 08-28-2019, 08:43 AM   #108
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Oh boy, the code "lawyers" are out today. Still can't wait to hear what that one thing is that I never bought when wiring all kinds of code compliant stuff over the past 40 years.

Can't be a ground rod since there is no place to use a ground rod, save when using a generator to power things. I wouldn't even venture a guess...
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Old 08-28-2019, 08:48 AM   #109
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Oh boy, the code "lawyers" are out today. Still can't wait to hear what that one thing is that I never bought when wiring all kinds of code compliant stuff over the past 40 years.

Can't be a ground rod since there is no place to use a ground rod, save when using a generator to power things. I wouldn't even venture a guess...
Yep... nothing like fear mongering and not even telling us what it is.

As I've previously said but it bears repeating... there is so much misinformation in some of these posts it will take a lot of 'cipherin' by the OP to get a correct suggestion on their query.
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:04 AM   #110
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30 or 50 amp outlet

If you are that close to your panel, all the better. My suggestion would be to install a 50 amp outlet. That way when you upgrade a 50 amp rv it is there. I use a 50 to 30 dogbone. Outlet is less than 2 feet from electrical box.
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:44 AM   #111
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As I've previously said but it bears repeating... there is so much misinformation in some of these posts it will take a lot of 'cipherin' by the OP to get a correct suggestion on their query.
That is an understatement!
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Old 08-28-2019, 10:38 AM   #112
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We had a 30A installed in Arizona

Yes we had it done in Arizona, and it was primarily so we could run the AC when we prep our rig. We had a licensed electricain do it and it ran me about $125 for the install and about $40 for the hardware (I made sure i bought the hardware to ensure it was correct).
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Old 08-28-2019, 10:54 AM   #113
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While a number of items might qualify, I'm guessing that you're referring to a grounding rod. I'd also suggest a properly installed surge protective device such as the Intermatic IG series, IG1240RC3.
you do not install a ground rod on a sub panel or an added outlet.
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Old 08-28-2019, 10:57 AM   #114
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I have a 30a Marine/RV outlet on the side of my house next to the driveway that allows me to use the trailer's shorepower cord easily. Wired via a separate 30a breaker. Since this only gets used a couple of times a year I fabricated a 20a outlet box for yard tools, air compressor, etc that's nearly always plugged in.

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You do know that those outlets are fussed at 30 amps right? I would have done the same.
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Old 08-28-2019, 02:27 PM   #115
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Of coarse one should always apply code and safety when doing any wiring effort. However each application is based on the situation and everyone is dynamic. This is where code & safety always rules.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:58 AM   #116
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I’m spending 2 weeks parked at my cousin’s house.....
Eddie?
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:47 PM   #117
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Originally Posted by Villagerjjm View Post
To all the respondents who said they did the wiring themselves: I have not seen any indication of the inclusion of one key component that is is required by code. Can you tell me what it is?
So, is the magical missing checklist item a multimeter or non-contact voltage tester? Instead of being an arrogant <*%@#!> maybe you should have just asked if your "customer" already had one, or suggested it as an important tool to have?

To most of us that do electrical wiring ourselves, a voltage tester or meter pretty well goes without saying.

PS-- Or, are you talking about testing for ground? That would require a continuity tester or the multimeter, again.
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Old 08-29-2019, 08:05 PM   #118
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So, is the magical missing checklist item a multimeter or non-contact voltage tester? Instead of being an arrogant <*%@#!> maybe you should have just asked if your "customer" already had one, or suggested it as an important tool to have?

To most of us that do electrical wiring ourselves, a voltage tester or meter pretty well goes without saying.

PS-- Or, are you talking about testing for ground? That would require a continuity tester or the multimeter, again.
I thought about that as well, and I do have both a couple of multimeters and a couple of non-contact voltage testers, but you know, you can wire all day and put in subpanels, feeds and outlets and never have a need to actually use one until something DOESN'T work.
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:13 AM   #119
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I have both a 30 A and a 50A outlet mounted on the outside of my garage in a weatherproof electrical panel. I use it all the time I'm parked except when I winterize and disconnect everything except the battery tender.
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Old 09-03-2019, 10:58 AM   #120
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Eddie?
CLOSE!

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