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Old 11-21-2022, 12:39 PM   #1
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Making the move from tent camping to a travel trailer!

We have been tent campers for several years but after some freezing weekends in the 30s and rainy weekends with downpours while tearing down/loading out, we are ready to get our first small (couple) travel trailer. Due to our towing capacity and the fact that it will just be the two of us for long weekend trips to local parks in the Southeast, we are looking at the 2022 Wolf Pup 16FQ Black Label as our entry point. Any feedback and thoughts would be really appreciated. Thanks in advance!
P.S. I know it is an entry level trailer, but it seems to fit our needs at this point.
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Old 11-21-2022, 12:59 PM   #2
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You mention weight limits. The dry (which is fictional) hitch weight on the trailer is 444 lbs. If your tow vehicle has a tongue weight limit of 500 lbs, you need to be very careful because it will be easy to go over 500 lbs real tongue weight on that trailer.

Also, I know this is a FR forum, but you might also want to look at the Sonic Lite line of trailers by Venture RV - like the SL169VRK or SL169VMK. They are lighter with a lower hitch weight.
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Old 11-21-2022, 01:52 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
You mention weight limits. The dry (which is fictional) hitch weight on the trailer is 444 lbs. If your tow vehicle has a tongue weight limit of 500 lbs, you need to be very careful because it will be easy to go over 500 lbs real tongue weight on that trailer.

Also, I know this is a FR forum, but you might also want to look at the Sonic Lite line of trailers by Venture RV - like the SL169VRK or SL169VMK. They are lighter with a lower hitch weight.
Thanks for the info. I will check into those. The tongue limit on my vehicle is actually 600 lbs.
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Old 11-21-2022, 04:17 PM   #4
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If you're ready to get out of tent camping, you'll never go back. Getting out of the rain and having dry bed and cold food were our motivating factors. We did over 30,000 miles and many National Parks in a similar trailer. The layout is good for a couple and it's lighter weight because you don't have a slide.

My only hesitation would be that it's a single axel trailer. That doesn't give you much room for error if you have a flat. Ours was a tandem axel trailer and that second tire on one side made a difference.
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Old 11-22-2022, 04:12 PM   #5
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The small single axle trailers are very popular. They cost a lot. You do not mention your tow vehicle. It is possible to get some very clean used 20 foot older trailers for a much lower price.
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Old 11-22-2022, 04:58 PM   #6
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If you're ready to get out of tent camping, you'll never go back. Getting out of the rain and having dry bed and cold food were our motivating factors. We did over 30,000 miles and many National Parks in a similar trailer. The layout is good for a couple and it's lighter weight because you don't have a slide.



My only hesitation would be that it's a single axel trailer. That doesn't give you much room for error if you have a flat. Ours was a tandem axel trailer and that second tire on one side made a difference.
Also single axle trailers have heavier tongue weights, than comparable tandem axle trailers.
Many have discovered that their single axle trailer's loaded tongue weight exceeds their mid-size tow vehicle's max hitch weight or the car's payload capacity.


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Old 11-22-2022, 05:17 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by MicBudd4144 View Post
We have been tent campers for several years but after some freezing weekends in the 30s and rainy weekends with downpours while tearing down/loading out, we are ready to get our first small (couple) travel trailer. Due to our towing capacity and the fact that it will just be the two of us for long weekend trips to local parks in the Southeast, we are looking at the 2022 Wolf Pup 16FQ Black Label as our entry point. Any feedback and thoughts would be really appreciated. Thanks in advance!
P.S. I know it is an entry level trailer, but it seems to fit our needs at this point.
The Wolf Pup 16FQ Black Label on paper is a real nice camper. I would have bought one if they were in stock when I bought my current trailer ( I am very happy with what I actually bought).

My buddy has a regular 16 foot Wolf Pup and loves it for the type of camping he does which is mostly State Park type dry camping. What do you have for a tow vehicle?
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Old 11-22-2022, 06:52 PM   #8
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The Wolf Pup 16FQ Black Label on paper is a real nice camper. I would have bought one if they were in stock when I bought my current trailer ( I am very happy with what I actually bought).

My buddy has a regular 16 foot Wolf Pup and loves it for the type of camping he does which is mostly State Park type dry camping. What do you have for a tow vehicle?
Tow vehicle is a 2020 Nissan Pathfinder 3.6L V6 with tow pkg. Rated for towing 6000 lbs and 600 hitch weight. We don't want to get anywhere near that weight and want to stay around 4800 total (dry +cargo for the trailer) and 500 max hitch weight. We will mostly be doing state park camping in the southeast, no boondocking. Planning on weight distribution hitch and sway bars.
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Old 11-22-2022, 06:55 PM   #9
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What fun…congrats on moving toward the world of ‘clamping’!

Today a small trailer, tomorrow a 45ft self contained Motorhome!

Congrats on the new rig! Nothing better than a dry, warm (or cool!) bed and cold food ready to be made hot! Enjoy the adventure!!!
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Old 11-22-2022, 10:08 PM   #10
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Welcome and keep it outdoors.

Went from tent to a small travel trailer and there certainly are benefits. The cons are all the upkeep and extra work that goes into prepping and ending trips. And the never ending expenses. Tent camping is definitely simpler and miss some aspects of it. Being able to get away from others is much easier and a big plus although the smaller the trailer the better.

I have a smaller G16BH and the hitch weight has gone up to just over 700 lbs. depending on the trip. My V8 Grand Cherokee has a 7,200/720 rating and not sure I'd try pulling the Wolf Pup even though the published hitch weight is lower than mine; could be due to build on yours that may be lighter at the hitch unloaded.

Not sure if these are you specs and just putting out for reference.
https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/trave...-pup/16FQ/6641
https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/trave...pro/G16BH/6162

Came back from a trip last week...rainy and low 30s. Noticed one other travel trailer, one van camper, four tent campers and two guys hammock camping.





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Old 11-23-2022, 09:30 AM   #11
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I would go no more than 80% your towng capacity.
Weight distribution hitch should allow you more lbs to understand weight. I believe mine says 500 or 700 lbs 1000 with weight distribution hitch
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Old 11-23-2022, 10:28 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Reverse_snowbird View Post
If you're ready to get out of tent camping, you'll never go back. Getting out of the rain and having dry bed and cold food were our motivating factors. We did over 30,000 miles and many National Parks in a similar trailer. The layout is good for a couple and it's lighter weight because you don't have a slide.

My only hesitation would be that it's a single axel trailer. That doesn't give you much room for error if you have a flat. Ours was a tandem axel trailer and that second tire on one side made a difference.
I wouldn’t know other random camping folks well enough to tell them they’d never want to tent camp again after buying a trailer. I’ve camped 65 nights in 2022. Most of those nights were in a class C, but many were in a single axle toy hauler trailer, and probably a dozen nights camping were in a two man tent. I own modern RVs and I enjoy them, but I still enjoy tent camping as well. Tent camping gives me a more intimate experience with the wilderness, and more sense of adventure as a result of the additional challenges. I also feel like I’m doing less harm to the environment. Variety is the spice of camping; being outdoors is the main thing. Camping in anything is better for me than a hotel.

To the OP: good luck with your quest for a travel trailer, and if you get one, may you enjoy many new adventures.
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Old 11-23-2022, 02:33 PM   #13
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Wolf pup has an Adventure package that adds a 5000# axle to the series vice the standard 3500# axle for a much better Cargo Capacity and also 1” bigger wheels and several more inches of clearance. Wheel and deal with the seller to change out the tires if you can for Goodyear endurance series. Much better than the standard CastleRocks.
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Old 11-23-2022, 04:20 PM   #14
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I would go no more than 80% your towng capacity.
Why not?
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Old 11-23-2022, 06:35 PM   #15
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That's the general rule.
Odds are you will be sorry maxing it out.
When I was looking at buying a tt years ago I looked at a never use viking, think it was 21 feet.
They towed it home camped in the driveway and was selling it, itt was too much to tow.
Maybe others wil chime in with there experiences.
I tow a 4k trailer. I'm at 50% my capacity I wouldn't want to tow 7900 what my truck is rated for. 6k maybe that would be it
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Old 11-23-2022, 06:39 PM   #16
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I wouldn’t know other random camping folks well enough to tell them they’d never want to tent camp again after buying a trailer. .
Lighten up. It's just my opinion and I'm not judging anyone.

Perhaps I should have said that, like the OP, we were motivated to get a couples tt because we'd had enough of "freezing weekends in the 30s and rainy weekends with downpours while tearing down/loading out" and WE wouldn't want to tent camp again.
There's nothing fun about tearing down a wet tent, sticking it in the trunk, driving to another campground and putting up a wet tent. By that time, you're as wet as the tent and car and driving in wet clothes.

I admire those who like to tent camp, but we don't like the set up and tear down time or being in a tent during a thunderstorm or listening to critters as they explore the edges of a tent.

We love to be in the outdoors, and camping in a tt gave us more freedom to do that. Once we put our stuff in our trailer, we could move from campground to campground with minimum set up and tear down. We now camp in a mini mh due to health problems.
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Old 11-23-2022, 07:03 PM   #17
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Perhaps I should have said that, like the OP, we were motivated to get a couples tt because we'd had enough of "freezing weekends in the 30s and rainy weekends with downpours while tearing down/loading out" and WE wouldn't want to tent camp again.
There's nothing fun about tearing down a wet tent, sticking it in the trunk, driving to another campground and putting up a wet tent. By that time, you're as wet as the tent and car and driving in wet clothes.

I admire those who like to tent camp, but we don't like the set up and tear down time or being in a tent during a thunderstorm or listening to critters as they explore the edges of a tent.

We love to be in the outdoors, and camping in a tt gave us more freedom to do that. Once we put our stuff in our trailer, we could move from campground to campground with minimum set up and tear down. We now camp in a mini mh due to health problems.
If my knees were any better, at 68, I would still be backpacking and sleeping in a tent. Even in thunderstorms. I miss it terribly. I also loved the sounds of the High Sierras, including the animal noises and being far away from campgrounds.
There's a big difference between looking at nature and being IN nature. That's what I miss.

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Old 11-23-2022, 09:39 PM   #18
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I have a 2019 Wolf Pup 16FQ, not Black Label, aluminum sided. It had the same advertised dry tongue weight of 444 lbs., GVWR 3944, with 3500 lb. axle. I've weighed it several times before trips. The first time was with no WDH, loaded for camping, full fresh water tank, and my tongue weight was 580 lbs. That's when I realized I needed a WDH, as my F-150 hitch is rated at 500 lb. max without WDH, and 1,050 with WDH.
Subsequent weights have shown 550 - 570 lbs.
I use an Andersen anti-sway WDH, and have been very pleased with it. Tows like a dream. I've had no issues with wind or truck traffic.
Also, my Wolf Pup has the Adventure Package previously mentioned. It has the lift and 235-75-15 aggressive tread tires, but still 3,500 lb. axle.
It's been great off road in some pretty gnarly conditions.
Despite being an entry level trailer, we've had no build quality issues, and it's been great for the 2 of us former tent campers.
We've towed it from the east coast to the west coast, and enjoyed every minute of it!
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Old 11-23-2022, 11:22 PM   #19
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If my knees were any better, at 68, I would still be backpacking and sleeping in a tent. Even in thunderstorms. I miss it terribly. I also loved the sounds of the High Sierras, including the animal noises and being far away from campgrounds.
There's a big difference between looking at nature and being IN nature. That's what I miss.
Well said. Now I’m itching to get the tent out one more time this season.
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Old Today, 07:22 PM   #20
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Congratulations on your camping upgrade! You will still have the cold weather and the rainy weather, but it will be so much easier to get through. My wife and I went from tents to a pop-up to a hybrid to a 22 foot mini lite to a 30 foot over the years to now. Each upgrade added more comfort. Besides all the smaller trips, we made a 5 month tour in the 22, foot hybrid. We lived full time in the 30 foot for over a year and a half while we travelled, plus so many smaller scale trips over the years with that.
Enjoy your new life change! Good luck!
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