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Old 02-26-2021, 11:38 PM   #1
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FYI Cooper Tire recall

Just a FYI for any Cooper Tire owners out there.

Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. is recalling more than 430,000 light truck tires in the U.S. because they can develop sidewall bulges.
The recall covers Discoverer, Evolution, Courser, Deegan, Adventurer, Hercules, Back Country, Multi-Mile, Wild Country and Big O tires in several sizes.

The tires were made between Feb. 1, 2018 and Dec. 1, 2019. Owners can contact the company at (800) 854-6288.
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Old 02-27-2021, 08:55 AM   #2
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Disappointed to see mine weren't on the list.. crappy tires. Never buying another set!
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Old 02-27-2021, 09:10 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by 007matman View Post
Disappointed to see mine weren't on the list.. crappy tires. Never buying another set!
Even if your were on the list you would still have Cooper tires. They would just replace the recalled tires. I have had every major brand of tire over 30 years of owning trucks and Cooper run the same as the rest. I have been buying them for the past 10 years. BTW, Cooper was just purchased by Goodyear.
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Old 02-27-2021, 09:11 AM   #4
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I called my dealer yesterday, Feb 26 2021, and they still had not received any guidance from Cooper on the recall yet.
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Old 02-27-2021, 10:51 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Cabinfever97 View Post
I called my dealer yesterday, Feb 26 2021, and they still had not received any guidance from Cooper on the recall yet.
In my OP I posted the number you call for more information. I'd try that first before the dealer.
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Old 02-27-2021, 10:56 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Cabinfever97 View Post
Even if your were on the list you would still have Cooper tires. They would just replace the recalled tires. I have had every major brand of tire over 30 years of owning trucks and Cooper run the same as the rest. I have been buying them for the past 10 years. BTW, Cooper was just purchased by Goodyear.
I love the Coopers on my truck. They gave me an extra MPG and for All Terrain they ride great and are almost silent on the road. Best I have ever had on a truck. I hope Goodyear leaves them alone on their all terrain off road truck tires.
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Old 02-27-2021, 11:19 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Cabinfever97 View Post
Even if your were on the list you would still have Cooper tires. They would just replace the recalled tires. I have had every major brand of tire over 30 years of owning trucks and Cooper run the same as the rest. I have been buying them for the past 10 years. BTW, Cooper was just purchased by Goodyear.
My biggest complaint is tread life and uneven tire wear. Getting a recall and my tires replaced for free would make me happy though.

My truck has been to 3 different shops and they all blame the same thing.. the tires.

BTW.. the recall info is on their website.
https://us.coopertire.com/for-owners...ll-information
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Old 02-27-2021, 02:54 PM   #8
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In my OP I posted the number you call for more information. I'd try that first before the dealer.
Right, but the dealer will likely be the one swapping tires if it comes to that. The dealer cant do anything until they have guidance from the manufacture.
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Old 02-27-2021, 08:01 PM   #9
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I've been running Coppers for over 30 years on three different pickups without any problems and have gotten as much as 90000 miles a set. I rotate tires at every oil change and check the air pressure regularly.
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Old 02-27-2021, 09:06 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by 007matman View Post
My biggest complaint is tread life and uneven tire wear. Getting a recall and my tires replaced for free would make me happy though.

My truck has been to 3 different shops and they all blame the same thing.. the tires.

BTW.. the recall info is on their website.
https://us.coopertire.com/for-owners...ll-information
Poor tread life might be a tire related problem but when coupled with the complaint "uneven tire wear" it's almost always related to alignment.

All to many shops, repair or tire, will blame the tires when they don't understand Wheel Alignment. It's all to common for the customer's car to be put on the alignment rack, angles adjusted to whatever is considered "manufacturer's spec's" and nobody bothered to look at how the existing (or old tires if aligned at time of replacement) tires were wearing.

A good alignment technician will observe wear patterns on tires BEFORE aligning and then apply the necessary adjustments to the existing alignment angles.

It's nice to get a fancy print out showing all alignment angles are "in the green" but there's a reason that the manufacturers allow a tolerance. Did you take your truck in fully loaded the way you drive? Did you take it in with the trailer attached? All those things affect the alignment angles and can cause tire wear.

A term that surfaced in the industry about 1980 is "Tailoring". Old-Time alignment techs did this all the time, making slight adjustments to the spec so the wear patterns on tires were mitigated. The new generation of "Tire Shop Alignment Computer Operators" don't bother as the manager is always shouting at them to hurry up they have another vehicle waiting.

When the problem continues, the tires are blamed. Same for wheel balancing. After balancing on the machine a few times, "it's got to be the tire". Some times it is and sometimes they just don't want to break the tire down and see if it has a quart of water, gravel, or even leftover pieces of a TPMS installation inside.

Also, for years and years people used to think that alignment wasn't a problem on rear drive axles. Starting in the mid-late 70's four wheel alignment systems opened up a lot of eyes. Problem was the solution required more specialized equipment and trained technicians (which cost more money) and the only cure offered in many cases was a complete axle housing replacement.

As for going to three shops that just blamed the tires, I'd say you may not have been to the RIGHT shop.

Me? I prefer to take my tire wear issues to a shop that specializes in Alignment. After 15 years under contract with an equipment manufacturer followed by 17 with a Tire Company I learned where to go.

I also prefer smaller, independent, tire shops to purchase my tires. More customer oriented and more focused on how well they can do a job, not how fast. I like shops where the owner is there every day. To him customers are his business. Shops with absentee owners, run by managers, don't have the same level of care.
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Old 02-27-2021, 10:06 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
Poor tread life might be a tire related problem but when coupled with the complaint "uneven tire wear" it's almost always related to alignment.

All to many shops, repair or tire, will blame the tires when they don't understand Wheel Alignment. It's all to common for the customer's car to be put on the alignment rack, angles adjusted to whatever is considered "manufacturer's spec's" and nobody bothered to look at how the existing (or old tires if aligned at time of replacement) tires were wearing.

A good alignment technician will observe wear patterns on tires BEFORE aligning and then apply the necessary adjustments to the existing alignment angles.

It's nice to get a fancy print out showing all alignment angles are "in the green" but there's a reason that the manufacturers allow a tolerance. Did you take your truck in fully loaded the way you drive? Did you take it in with the trailer attached? All those things affect the alignment angles and can cause tire wear.

A term that surfaced in the industry about 1980 is "Tailoring". Old-Time alignment techs did this all the time, making slight adjustments to the spec so the wear patterns on tires were mitigated. The new generation of "Tire Shop Alignment Computer Operators" don't bother as the manager is always shouting at them to hurry up they have another vehicle waiting.

When the problem continues, the tires are blamed. Same for wheel balancing. After balancing on the machine a few times, "it's got to be the tire". Some times it is and sometimes they just don't want to break the tire down and see if it has a quart of water, gravel, or even leftover pieces of a TPMS installation inside.

Also, for years and years people used to think that alignment wasn't a problem on rear drive axles. Starting in the mid-late 70's four wheel alignment systems opened up a lot of eyes. Problem was the solution required more specialized equipment and trained technicians (which cost more money) and the only cure offered in many cases was a complete axle housing replacement.

As for going to three shops that just blamed the tires, I'd say you may not have been to the RIGHT shop.

Me? I prefer to take my tire wear issues to a shop that specializes in Alignment. After 15 years under contract with an equipment manufacturer followed by 17 with a Tire Company I learned where to go.

I also prefer smaller, independent, tire shops to purchase my tires. More customer oriented and more focused on how well they can do a job, not how fast. I like shops where the owner is there every day. To him customers are his business. Shops with absentee owners, run by managers, don't have the same level of care.
Thanks for the write-up.

It's been aligned twice. Inspected 3 times and I've personally replaced all of the wearable items.. tie rods (outer/Inner), ball joints, hubs, brakes, etc. Bought a brand new set for the front (I'm particular about my tires matching) and the did the same stinking thing.

I've spent several thousand, took it to some of the best shops in the area and still have uneven wear. What i do know for sure is that the BFG's that were on there before were evenly worn when they were replaced.

At this point I'd love to find a reason for it outside of the tires but to date there is nothing. The shops I've been to all blame the tires.
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Old 02-28-2021, 09:39 AM   #12
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Just saw on the news that Cooper Tire has been bought out by Goodyear.
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Old 02-28-2021, 09:49 AM   #13
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Some Cooper tires run smaller diameter than standard, maybe to save a few $. This results in the speedometer/odometer being off and deceivingly better gas mileage.
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