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Old 11-05-2017, 10:56 AM   #1
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Winterizing

Went to a winterizing seminar at my dealer yesterday. Lots of good advise like
Don't store with tires on concrete..use wood instead.

One thing in particular...
Don't use rv antifreeze that is alcohol based. The alcohol can dry out any rubber seals in the plumbing system, causing early failure.
Use rv antifreeze that is glycol based. Glycol will help to condition the rubber.

Didn't know.
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Old 11-05-2017, 11:42 AM   #2
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Propylene Glycol

https://www.homedepot.com/p/South-Wi...7005/202530435
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Old 11-07-2017, 08:05 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jking46 View Post
Went to a winterizing seminar at my dealer yesterday. Lots of good advise like
Don't store with tires on concrete..use wood instead.

One thing in particular...
Don't use rv antifreeze that is alcohol based. The alcohol can dry out any rubber seals in the plumbing system, causing early failure.
Use rv antifreeze that is glycol based. Glycol will help to condition the rubber.

Didn't know.
Just curious... why shouldn't you store the HTT with the tires on concrete?
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Old 11-07-2017, 08:49 AM   #4
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I don't know the chemistry involved but they said the concrete can pull moisture and oils out of the rubber, causing the tires to potentially fail.
Given the number of tire failures we hear about, don't think that's a chance I want to take.
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Old 11-07-2017, 12:52 PM   #5
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That's old time practice, like not putting batteries on concrete.
Modern tires and batteries have no issues on concrete.
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Old 11-07-2017, 12:57 PM   #6
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I have a concrete driveway that my car(s) spend many hours on. I've never had a problem with my tires.

When I had a pop-up I stored it on that same driveway all winter long with no issues.
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Old 11-07-2017, 03:06 PM   #7
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Pretty much every brand marked as RV antifreeze will be alcohol free and safe to later flush into septic and sewer systems.
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Old 11-07-2017, 03:53 PM   #8
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As I said, don't know about the chemistry involved in the tires. Merely passing along advise from a dealer with no skin in the game. They don't sell tires.
As for the antifreeze, checking online I found several brands of rv antifreeze with ethanol listed in the ingredients.
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Old 11-07-2017, 08:29 PM   #9
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As for the antifreeze, checking online I found several brands of rv antifreeze with ethanol listed in the ingredients.
Yep, but there's no need to pay dealer prices for Propylene Glycol anti freeze.
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Old 11-07-2017, 08:40 PM   #10
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Lots of us park on concrete driveways, so I'm not buying that. Also, wood is porous, so you would think it would be more of an issue.
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Old 11-07-2017, 09:16 PM   #11
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How many millions of concrete driveways just in the US?
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Old 11-07-2017, 09:49 PM   #12
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I'll start off with a full disclosure that I am a Georgetown owner so maybe this is comparing apples to oranges. However, I'll still throw in my two cents and get out.

The Michelin Truck Tire Service Manual states since some surfaces causes tires to age faster, Michelin recommends placing plastic, cardboard or plywood between the tire and storage surface.

I would imagine this practice is beneficial for all types of tires.

Yes, I have a concrete driveway. Yes, I park my truck and jeep on the concrete driveway. But, they are only sitting stationary for a few days. For the price of a few pressure treated boards, my RV will not be "stored" on concrete.
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Old 11-07-2017, 10:58 PM   #13
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I'll start off with a full disclosure that I am a Georgetown owner so maybe this is comparing apples to oranges. However, I'll still throw in my two cents and get out.

The Michelin Truck Tire Service Manual states since some surfaces causes tires to age faster, Michelin recommends placing plastic, cardboard or plywood between the tire and storage surface.

I would imagine this practice is beneficial for all types of tires.

Yes, I have a concrete driveway. Yes, I park my truck and jeep on the concrete driveway. But, they are only sitting stationary for a few days. For the price of a few pressure treated boards, my RV will not be "stored" on concrete.
First let me say I believe this is much ado about nothing.

With that said, I can maybe understand Michelin's suggestion of "plastic, cardboard or plywood" for long term storage but I'm not sure I would want my tires setting on 'treated' lumber for months with those chemicals leaching into/reacting with the rubber contact patch.
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Old 11-07-2017, 11:32 PM   #14
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I think the concrete question is based on partial info.

Some concrete holds lots of moisture and some locations even end with standing water on the concrete. Moisture can migrate into the tire structure and in some cases may cause a problem with the steel belts.

If a tire is driven on, it gets warm and the moisture is driven out of the rubber but long-term exposure to standing water and not being warmed from driving may cause long-term problems.

Bottom line.
Do not expose tires to petroleum (oil or tar) or water in long-term parking. Petroleum can attack the rummer polymer bonds and moisture can attack the steel in the belts.
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Old 11-08-2017, 10:58 PM   #15
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Wood is good. Well that's what we used to say in my softball playing days. But then again we swung composite bats, go figure..

I've been parking my campers on wood for years. Never had a tire problem. This kept the tires out of puddles, off the asphalt and spread out the load over a larger area of the drive.
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