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Old 12-25-2019, 04:13 AM   #61
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before backing up try to pull the trailer in and give yourself the best position to begin the backup procedure. The tail of the trailer pointing toward the parking spot an the truck in relatively straight line with it The trick is to grab the steering wheel on the very bottom with one hand. In this position if you want the trailer to turn to the left move your hand left and to move the trailer right move your hand right. If you also have good vehicle/trailer starting position you should never have to move the steering hand from 6 o'clock position beyond the 9 o'clock or 3 o'clock positions to back her in. Other good suggestions were to imagine an arc and watch mainly the trailer tires and slowly get the trailer onto that arc as it backs in. What youll find is that once you get it moving on that arc you wont need a lot of steering corrections.
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Old 12-25-2019, 07:59 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by Mike134 View Post
I like to back in from the left if I can, allows me to look out the drivers side window to watch the trailer. From the right it's not as easy
This, if I keep it the left mirror then I can get as close as I want to the utilities.
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Old 01-06-2020, 10:14 PM   #63
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Youíve been given a lot of good tips and tricks here. I wish I could tell you one little thing that would miraculously work every time but there is not. Experience is the only thing I know that will help. I retired from trucking with almost 40 years. Some of it cross country and a good bit of p&d (local pick up and delivery). When backing, only 2 people exist. You and your designated spotter. Any time you canít see your spotter, STOP. Any time you are not sure about anything, STOP and get out and look. Iíve trained a good many drivers over the years. Back 6-8-10 feet at the time and see what is needed to correct it to what you need. Then do a little more. There is no dishonor in having to pull up or rethink what you need to do. I use my spotter (wife)to watch the trailer and stop me if Iím getting close to something I canít see. The difference in length is what is messing with you but itís actually only about half as much difference in the wheelbase. The trailer tire position is what you need to watch. Thatís the pivot point. Let your spotter watch the trailer. Everyone is trying to help by giving tips on what to do but until you see the situation and know what corrective measures are needed, you need to keep practicing. Iíve had good and bad days. One day I canít miss, next day nothing works. Donít get aggravated. Everybody has to learn.
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Old 01-09-2020, 05:17 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by OLEJOE View Post
Youíve been given a lot of good tips and tricks here. I wish I could tell you one little thing that would miraculously work every time but there is not. Experience is the only thing I know that will help. I retired from trucking with almost 40 years. Some of it cross country and a good bit of p&d (local pick up and delivery). When backing, only 2 people exist. You and your designated spotter. Any time you canít see your spotter, STOP. Any time you are not sure about anything, STOP and get out and look. Iíve trained a good many drivers over the years. Back 6-8-10 feet at the time and see what is needed to correct it to what you need. Then do a little more. There is no dishonor in having to pull up or rethink what you need to do. I use my spotter (wife)to watch the trailer and stop me if Iím getting close to something I canít see. The difference in length is what is messing with you but itís actually only about half as much difference in the wheelbase. The trailer tire position is what you need to watch. Thatís the pivot point. Let your spotter watch the trailer. Everyone is trying to help by giving tips on what to do but until you see the situation and know what corrective measures are needed, you need to keep practicing. Iíve had good and bad days. One day I canít miss, next day nothing works. Donít get aggravated. Everybody has to learn.
Well said!
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Old 01-12-2020, 02:14 PM   #65
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I've found "the scoop" maneuver to be very helpful prior to beginning the backup process. It angles the TT on the road just past the campsite. In most cases, this allows for a more moderate (and controlled) backing up effort.

There are some other good tips for beginners in this video so it's worth watching the whole thing. If you want to skip to "the scoop", start playing at the 4:50 mark.

https://youtu.be/lzlOfBGr1i4
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Old 01-12-2020, 05:21 PM   #66
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My TT is 35ft. The best thing i every did was get a backup camera. It made everything so much easier.

Other than that, practice in a vacant parking lot.
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