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Old 08-10-2015, 11:23 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Radio View Post
4. Take the truck driver out for pizza and beer.

Done.
Sometimes this might be best before you practice.

I park in my driveway but my house sits back from the street and where I park to the street is about 75' plus I park on leveling blocks and the TT is between shrubbery with about 6" space on each side. I live in a cul-de-sac so I can block the street if necessary. It takes a couple forward and reverse's to get the TT straightened up with the driveway (which is not straight). I'm getting better now, it only took one try the last trip. I do have to get out and check my position a few times mainly because I have to do it by myself.

The best suggestion I have is hold you steering wheel at he bottom and move your hand on the wheel in the direction you want the rear of the trailer to go. I have to keep reminding myself of that but it works very well.
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Old 08-10-2015, 11:29 AM   #22
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I purchased a Rock wood 2503s. It's the first trailer I've had in decades. I'm terrible with backing into sites. I wish there was a class available to take. I've watched a dozen YouTube videos but that hasn't done much to improve my skills. Is there a good book to read, a class to take, or tips experienced folks could share?
Find a large parking lot and go for it.
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Old 08-10-2015, 11:49 AM   #23
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Backing into RV sites.

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Find a large parking lot and go for it.
I solved the problem by reserving only drive through sites!
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Old 08-10-2015, 11:50 AM   #24
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We have a 31 ft TT. My DH finds it easier to back in with the electric brakes unplugged from the TV.
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Old 08-10-2015, 11:50 AM   #25
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Th trick that works for me is the following:

When backing up start with your hands at the bottom of the wheel (6 o'clock).

Looking into the mirrors, if you want to make the trailer turn to the left, start turning with your left hand up the left side of the wheel (or clockwise).

Looking in the mirrors if you want to make the trailer turn to the right, start turning the wheel with your right hand up the right side of the wheel (or counterclockwise).
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Old 08-10-2015, 12:05 PM   #26
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Backup Training.

A place that can assist you in learning how to back into a spot is any Truck Driving School in your area. They specialize in teaching that.
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Old 08-10-2015, 12:10 PM   #27
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I would add a few words for the "spotter", which usually means spouse.
Don't "wave" instructions. Not sure what that means, or if even intended for the driver. Could be flirting with neighbor.
Don't "flap" your hands. Not exactly sure what that means either and crying after the fact doesn't help.
Timid little hand jerks close to your body can NOT be seen through the rear view mirrors.
DO:
Look for me in the rear view (side) mirrors. If you do not see me, I don't see you.
Hold arms upright, away from your body.
Straight means come straight back.
Both arms tilted to one side means to move the back to that side.
Distance between the hands means how much room I have to go.
Wide arms means keep coming, long way to go.
Crossing arms in frantic motion means "STOP". We have to try again.

Okay. I've tried this communication with my "spotter" before. She still waves at the neighbor, so either futile, or she is trying to get something else going. Hope you have better luck.
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Old 08-10-2015, 12:15 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by RickRed52 View Post
I purchased a Rock wood 2503s. It's the first trailer I've had in decades. I'm terrible with backing into sites. I wish there was a class available to take. I've watched a dozen YouTube videos but that hasn't done much to improve my skills. Is there a good book to read, a class to take, or tips experienced folks could share?
All the suggestions here are good. For me it was a natural having owned my own farm and worked in the oil patch with all kinds of trucks and trailers.

This is what works for me. I pull up to my site (and turn my flashers on), I walk the site checking for over head branches and other possible obstacles that could do damage. Then I pick a land mark, like a rock, shrub or tree (or make a mark in the dirt) where I want the driver-side of the trailer to line up with.

I then pull ahead at least a trailer length on an angle across road (if possible), this way you have already eliminated some of the turning of the trailer.

if at all possible, line up your trailer so when you back in you see the trailer and the entrance to the site in your driver side mirror. This way it is way easier as you start backing up and you can even turn your head a bit (to your left) if needed and you will see the whole trailer and the entrance to your site.

As you back in, look for your land mark and you will do just fine.

Backing in from the passenger side takes more practice.

If you do it enough times it will become second nature, but it does take practice, no way around it.

Good luck
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Old 08-10-2015, 12:33 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by RickRed52 View Post
I purchased a Rock wood 2503s. It's the first trailer I've had in decades. I'm terrible with backing into sites. I wish there was a class available to take. I've watched a dozen YouTube videos but that hasn't done much to improve my skills. Is there a good book to read, a class to take, or tips experienced folks could share?
I used this video and found their tips EXTREMELY helpful...and then...I practiced...also we did the walkie talkie thing and best $40 we ever spent!

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Old 08-10-2015, 12:35 PM   #30
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GOAL

Get out and look
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Old 08-10-2015, 12:48 PM   #31
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I was going to say exactly what Toad on the Road and Pod2vibe said:

1) Hands on the bottom of the steering wheel and the trailer will go in the direction your hands move.
2) Practice, practice, practice in a large parking lot, the striping will act as parking guides. If there is no striping purchase a few orange traffic cones to aim at. You should have a couple of those with you for emergencies anyway.
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Old 08-10-2015, 01:03 PM   #32
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Practice in a parking lot use cones to simulate the camp site your trying to get into also only give your self the same amount of room as most parks give to back in. Its all practice, Practice, Practice.
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Old 08-10-2015, 01:06 PM   #33
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if your trailer's dry weight is below 5000LBS then you can use this "Trailer Valet" tool for backing it up. I have not used it in the CG but I have used it to backup my trailer (Flagstaff T12RBST) in the garage.
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Old 08-10-2015, 02:16 PM   #34
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Best video that I have found is from a pro at C. R. England Trucking. It is for a semi, but the principles are the same. I have a 30 foot trailer that I had trouble backing in until I watched this.
Then like others have said, it takes lots of practice. Lots!
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Old 08-10-2015, 03:24 PM   #35
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Any farmer that can back a wagon load of grain up to an elevator with a tractor would consider any backing of any RV a piece of cake.
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Old 08-10-2015, 04:17 PM   #36
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We invented some new words and our volume rose as we became more frustrated. I'd turn too much and then start over. My advise is two walkie talkies and practice. We just came back from our first three week trip and the best think I did was to have DW back it up into the camp spot and drive while we hitched and unhitched.
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Old 08-10-2015, 05:40 PM   #37
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One Word

Practice.
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Old 08-10-2015, 05:42 PM   #38
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I think my biggest problem is knowing how to position the trailer in relation to the site.
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Old 08-10-2015, 05:51 PM   #39
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I think my biggest problem is knowing how to position the trailer in relation to the site.
Take a look at the video I posted above. The teacher in this video talks a lot about the set up. I tried it exactly the way he teaches it and I will never go back to anything else. I hope it helps. I did go out and back it up a couple of times both drivers side and passenger side and put it exactly where I wanted it. The other day I backed up the entire length of our road just for fun and had no trouble. I just followed the clues and keys he states in the video.
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Old 08-10-2015, 06:24 PM   #40
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Pizza and beer

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1. Find a friend (or friend of a friend) who is a professional truck driver.
2. Set up the cones in a parking lot
3. Practice doing what he says until you get it.
4. Take the truck driver out for pizza and beer.

Done.
And after the pizza and beer......TRY AGAIN. LOL
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