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Old 08-10-2015, 06:52 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Pod2Vibe View Post
Practice in the biggest empty parking lot you can find, prior to your next trip.
x2....i use the fairgrounds parking lot for all the driver training i do before we even hit the road...
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Old 08-10-2015, 07:03 PM   #42
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Instance responce.

Over the years I taught a lot of driver to back. So far you been given a lot of good information. Now to fine tune that, 1.have good mirrors 2. step off how far it is sewer drain pipe to the wheels of your trailer ( remember this info). 3. decide where you want your drain pipe stopped and measure where your wheels will be when you stop. 4.I use my gloves to mark the spot where my wheels should stop. 5. now stop backing the end of your trailer, that's to far away. 6. tilt your mirror so you can see your trailer wheels. you'll find they are much easier to control than the end of your trailer. 7. Spot your glove and back your trailer up until the wheels are right next to the glove. Now your spotted and your sewer pipe is right where you wanted it.
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Old 08-10-2015, 07:53 PM   #43
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Oh no not the backing in part

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Originally Posted by RickRed52 View Post
I purchased a Rock wood 2503s. It's the first trailer I've had in decades. I'm terrible with backing into sites. I wish there was a class available to take. I've watched a dozen YouTube videos but that hasn't done much to improve my skills. Is there a good book to read, a class to take, or tips experienced folks could share?
Many new people are getting into Rving and a lot of people are not comfortable driving something like trailers and or motorhomes.

I think to all here if you look at the posts in this forum it may help you and many others (http://www.forestriverforums.com/for...ms+-+Emails%29)

I hope this helps you and many others with some driving help
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Old 08-10-2015, 08:18 PM   #44
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Backing you baby up

I have owned my R Pod for a year and a half now; I am still scared when backing her in, especially my driveway. I have to call ahead to a neighbor so that they will spot for me. I am almost afraid to book a back in site. My Neopolitan Mastiff ties to help, bless her heart, but it is best to ignore her directional signals :-) I have learned to kill all distractions, noises like the radio etc. I can back in to a spot in a large parking lot on my own ( if there is nothing around I could possibly hit ) but that's the extent of it. I agree with everyone, hands on the bottom of the steering wheel and lots of practice. Cheers
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Old 08-10-2015, 08:53 PM   #45
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That's an excellent video for anyone who has trouble backing into a spot thanks for posting it


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Old 08-10-2015, 09:40 PM   #46
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Great info and suggestions !
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Old 08-10-2015, 09:45 PM   #47
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Here is the best video that helped the most on how to back in a site

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Old 08-10-2015, 10:16 PM   #48
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Baking up a 5th wheel isn't the same as back up a trailer
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Old 08-10-2015, 10:44 PM   #49
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Smile Back up camera

The best $100.00 ever spent was for an after market camera. Don't bother with a wireless one reception is bad. DH has a very hard time with left and right. So I do most of the backing. We wired the camera power to the running lights and ran the video cable down thru the ladder, under the camper with stick-on cable clips, up thru the front compartment, then thru front wall with adapter, more clips to the king pin. Cable in truck was run under the seat out the back of the truck ( two more thru wall adapters for truck body and truck bed). As long as your head lights are on the camera works. Some cameras even have sound. Ebay is the best deals on all components needed.
Now just practice.
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Old 08-11-2015, 12:58 AM   #50
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I purchased my Georgetown Class A at Lazydays RV Center. They offer free driving classes every month for both TTs and MHs.
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Old 08-11-2015, 02:10 AM   #51
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I find that the roads to the site are very narrow so that when you do back up a TT, the front of the truck can get into trouble. If it doesn't go in one way, go around and try the other way. What I learnt is book a site with an another site across the way. The rest comes with experience
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Old 08-11-2015, 02:16 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickRed52 View Post
Backing up a 5th wheel isn't the same as backing up a trailer
Not true. The pivot points differ but the physics associated with moving (backing) that fiver or TT RV with the TV are identical. The trick, which takes practice, is understanding how your particular TV will translate front wheel turn input into RV rotation about the pivot point. Fivers react quicker to inputs because the pivot is closer to the front end of the TV - they're more maneuverable. TTs are slower to respond to steering input and can be obnoxious to back when they're 30+ ft. Much of the input within this thread has recommended finding a somewhere to practice backing into a supposed camp site. I strongly endorse that. Practice, practice and then... practice! You're the only one that can ultimately define and hone your ability to master this backing up thing.

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Old 08-11-2015, 04:11 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickRed52 View Post
I purchased a Rock wood 2503s. It's the first trailer I've had in decades. I'm terrible with backing into sites. I wish there was a class available to take. I've watched a dozen YouTube videos but that hasn't done much to improve my skills. Is there a good book to read, a class to take, or tips experienced folks could share?
RickRed,
I used to have a hard time backing up using my mirrors. I got confused with the hand on the bottom of the wheel technique. I saw this video on YouTube from an old trucker and like he says, it was a revelation for me. I now back like pro. See if it hepls you.



For positioning the trailer as you come to the site? Pull past the site hugging the site entrance. Pull past so the end of the trailer is even with the entrance. As you start backing straight watch your trailer wheels while the spotter watches the back of the trailer for obstacles. As soon as the wheels get a few feet away from the entrance, start your arch. Keep a eye on your front bumper to not swing into anything as you are going in. When the wheels get a couple feet into the entrance, you will have to really turn to get the wheels of the trailer to pivot.Once you start the pivot just follow it in. Use the tips from the video I posted. It might take a few tries but you can do it.
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Old 08-11-2015, 09:31 AM   #54
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One basic thing to remember...when backing, turn the wheel in the opposite direction to the way you want the backend to go. That is the hardest thing for people to get used to. Find a large, fairly empty parking lot (large church on off days) and practice trying to get it backed into a parking spot. I have suggested this to quite a few people and all of them said it helped quite a bit. Good luck!
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Old 08-11-2015, 02:24 PM   #55
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My wife has been my spotter for all the years we have pulled a trailer. I use the mirrors, and listen to her directions. Never have any trouble, unless someone else takes her place, or I use a different tow vehicle. The wheelbase of the tow-car can make a big difference in the ease of backing into sites. When I pulled my PUP with the old Jeep Cherokee, I had all kinds of trouble, but my Pacifica tamed the beast and now I can almost back in with my eyes closed. I'll miss that car when it's done! It has over 130k miles on it, and shows no signs of giving up yet!
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Old 08-11-2015, 07:47 PM   #56
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For me, the sooner I can see with my driver's side rearview mirror the better. Don't try to swing it in there on the first attempt. Back up, pull forward a little and get it as straight as possible. Make sure your spotter can see whatever mirror you are using at the time, so you can see them. Stay calm and have a laugh. Everyone that watches you has had problems also. Give 'em a show. But, practice if you need to. The most important thing is how far to go past your site before you stop and start backing. You need to know how much distance it takes to get your trailer turning and give it a chance to turn.
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Old 08-11-2015, 09:49 PM   #57
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Put the rear wheels of your tow vehicle in the center of the space you will pull into. That is your starting point.
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:07 PM   #58
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And park as close as you can parallel to the opening across the site to line everything up.
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:45 PM   #59
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When my DW was learning how to back our TT, she said the best advice I gave her was to turn the BOTTOM of the steering wheel in the same direction you want the rear of the trailer to go and not having to remember to go opposite from the top. This was her first attempt to back it. Now she wants to park it all the time....which is fine with me. lol Now I just tell her when to stop.
We have a rearview camera on the back of the unit, but it's totally worthless. Needs a signal amplifier, but don't think they make such.
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Old 08-12-2015, 05:15 AM   #60
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I've never had any issues backing anything but we learned at an early age in 4-H. Back in those days they had tractor driving as one of the thing you could do.

They had a 4 wheel wagon class and 2 wheel trailer class. Local, regional, semi state and state competition.

In our business we have to back large trailers behind our trucks into tight & close spaces.

The one thing I would add is for the driver & spotter to have a definite understanding what the spotters hand signal means. In my case I have the spotter point either left or right. Whatever way the spotter points is the direction that the REAR of the trailer needs to go

Our case requires that we get within inches not feet of where we need to be.

The other thing. Just practice.

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