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Old 02-16-2019, 04:34 PM   #1
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Made the move to a HW27KS

Excited to have moved from a 2007 (206st) to a 2015 (HW27KS). Love the extra space and higher base cabinet height as well as the easy to reach refrigerator when closed. Best of all it still fits in the garage.
I have read about issues with the dump valves. Any other concerns I might run across that can be shared would be much appreciated. Thanks everyone and hope we all have an early spring.
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Old 02-18-2019, 07:34 AM   #2
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I had this exact model for a while. I also liked everything you mentioned. I used a BAL leveler that worked great.

Somewhere on this forum, there’s instructions with part numbers, on how to make an adapter so the that the grey outlet fits a standard 3” hose. That’s what I did and it worked well.
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Old 02-18-2019, 08:50 AM   #3
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we had the Rockwood twin (the HW277). The fridge access while closed and the outside kitchen were the reasons we picked this model. We had a great time with it; dragged it all over the place (close to 19,000 miles in 6 years). Made overnight stops very easy (we took it on a 2 week trip from Maryland to Yellowstone) - just pull/back in, level, raise the top, slide out the beds, set the door, and we were set up and ready to hit the pool. It was the perfect popup for us.



Most of our issues were owner (me) caused. it was our first camper and we learned alot about them through the mistakes we made with it. we had a water leak that took us a long time to find - it turned out to be the grey connection under the shower. When the grey tank overfilled - it would not come up in the shower pan but run from under the shower pan, under the dinette slide out and the first we would see it was around the fridge. We kept looking around the fridge. eventually, we had the front wall start to pull away when we had the bed pulled out. It got real bad when the unit was 5 years old and we had to have extra bracing put in.


Some others have reported the front wall flexing. Just keep an eye on any gap that may form between the cabinet and the wall when the bed is pulled out. That tells you that the front wall is flexing and you may need to add some extra support/bracing.
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Old 02-18-2019, 11:04 AM   #4
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We have a 2009 Flagsetaff HW27SC (no slide out kitchen). Love the space and the high ceiling. It has been great although there is always some minor issues to be addressed. Nature of the beast. Be sure you keep a close eye on the caulking and take care of any issues immediately. The front wall also began pulling away also as evidenced by space between wall and curbside cabinet. Had to reinforce it and no more problems to date. Hope you enjoy your as much as we have ours.
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Old 02-22-2019, 10:27 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MohicanJeff View Post
Excited to have moved from a 2007 (206st) to a 2015 (HW27KS). Love the extra space and higher base cabinet height as well as the easy to reach refrigerator when closed. Best of all it still fits in the garage.
I have read about issues with the dump valves. Any other concerns I might run across that can be shared would be much appreciated. Thanks everyone and hope we all have an early spring.
Congrats on the new camper. It's a real nice one.

I just downsized from a 2012 29' Jayco Jay Flight 26BH to the 2019 2716G. The pop up offers the same interior, sitting and sleeping as the large Jayco so that's why I went with my model.

The High walls were nice for sure, but not sure if they would fit a garage. I'm glad it fit into yours.

The nice thing about buying a newer used camper, is that all the new camper problems should be fixed and worked out.

Enjoy, I'm just waiting for April when winter should finally break and I should be able to get the camper up without it being covered in ice and snow or with -32 degree weather and -56 degree wind chills.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:36 PM   #6
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We have a 2014 HW 277.

No trouble with front wall separation. I suggest that you ensure that the bed support pipes are set to keep the bed well supported. I'me 6'6" and 260#...and married. I just make sure the supports "lift" the bed slightly to carry the weight.

Lift the suspension if you plan to boondock. I had to buy a double-axle lift kit, but someone in the forums snapped up the unused second axle lift in no time. (see photo of kit and see it installed in the photo of the fresh tank support)

The stairs are very vulnerable to dragging on sharp breakovers and in whoop-de-doos "off-road." The internal road network in our favorite lakeside boondocking campground is poorly maintained and the up and down dips dragged the stairs. Once lifted, I removed the stairs and used a 6# sledge and anvil to straighten everything, and I added a second piece of angle iron to stiffen the mounts for the stairs.

The outside sink is awesome. The outside stove pretty much sucks unless there is no wind. Plus the burner space is tight for full-sized pans. I've replaced the knobs once already because they get overheated from "under-pan-heat-splash".

The mounts for the stove suck. Little snap-in clips and screws. I replaced them with small metal molly anchors, tiny angle brackets, auto body J-nuts, and 1/4" round-head, hex drive bolts...stainless steel. This is a sturdy repair that can be re-done over time.

Also, if you boondock, lay in a supply of nuts, bolts and screws in a variety of sizes. Store them in something like this. If a screw falls out, it's best to replace it with a "Plus 1" size AND add Gorilla glue to the hole and the threads. Problem areas:
~ rear hinge mount for folding bathroom wall. Definitely larger screws and glue. On the front wall, check the acorn nuts often and keep them tight. Always use LocTite on any nut or bolt.
~ hanger for bottom of main door where attached to the roof. Replace screws in particle board with stainless bolts and nylock nuts. They are under the awning, so they won't leak.
~ outside table/grill hanger rail. Aluminum screws into particle board give out easily. Upsize AND add more in stainless...not aluminum. Gorilla glue.
~ under-sink cabinet door is big and heavy...and hard on the hinges. Buy spare hinges and put them with your hardware. Get slightly larger screws for the hinges and use Gorilla glue.
~ keep a close eye on your inside stove top. Things vibrate apart on the burners and the glass flip lid. LocTite is your friend, but vigilance is required on sheet metal screws and the plastic bolts on the glass lid.
~ always police the camper for parts on the floor when you arrive.
~ dark (e.g. walnut) stain will absorb into the MDF (or whatever) substrate on the cabinets and disguise scratches and mars.
~ your inside kitchen sink drain is garden variety drain plumbing that vibrates apart. Always double check that it's snug when you setup. I managed to tighten mine enough (by hand) to keep that from happening, but I had two incidents where the kitchen sink was draining into the cabinet.
~ again with the rigors of boondocking, the under-camper drain plumbing cracked at a "tee." I replaced the tee with a rubber Fernco tee...which allows enough flex to keep that from happening again. I had to use some additional straight pipe and couplers to replace pipe that was glued into the original tee, but it was an easy fix.

Also, if you want to flush the grey tank, open the outdoor kitchen and put a garden hose in the sink drain. It will flow well and flush out the drain and tank.

I haven't had problems with the dump valves. I use one of these to back-flush the black tank, and I use the above described procedure to flush the grey tank. This leaves both dump valves clean. There are quite a few of the black tank flush devices to choose from...mine is slightly different...it has a 45 degree bend. The water comes out of the black tank absolutely clear, and it flushes the drain hose, too.

As for the grey dump: Since I boondock and the grey tank is only 12 gallons, I dump it daily...into a bucket. In a campground, you can tote it to a vault toilet or bathroom to dump. In the wilderness, water the trees. Sink/shower water will not hurt the environment. Soaps (surfactants) are soil amendments...and "Dawn" is used to clean contaminated waterfowl after oil spills. This comment may spark debate, but this has been discussed to death. I have a Valtera adapter to connect my grey dump to about 10' of garden hose to dump into my bucket. I'm frequently lake-side on a slope, so the 10' hose ducks under the camper to dump in the bucket on the lower ground.

If you are in a campground with hookups (I can't imagine why in a PUP), one of these will work. Note that the adapter will create a natural "J trap" in the hose to prevent sewer odors from chasing back up the garden hose. There's no reason to connect the grey dump to the black dump, and doing so will contaminate the grey water emerging from the black dump.

SUPPORT YOUR FRESH TANK. SEE PHOTO. 26 gallons of water in a plastic jug under the camper will ruin the fresh tank if you travel full...which you often must do to boondock. My support is super easy: 1/2" galvanized water pipe, plywood, rubber mat, pipe clamps, and two clevis pins.

Get a full-sized grease gun and grease the hell out of the cables in the metal guide rail (two zerk fittings). At each corner, there are two hex screws holding the cable guide tubes. "Lower" the winch to create additional slack in the lift cable...use one hand to pull the cable sideways (up) to avoid tangles. 4" to 6" of lateral play will be enough slack to be able to drop the corners one at a time and shoot silicone lube down the tubes and on the cables where they make the turn. You may need to adjust the lower limit on the limit switch to allow this.

Speaking of the limit switch on the lift winch. This thing is trouble-prone. It's driven by plastic gear teeth that mesh with the main steel lift gear. Mine sheered off in season 1. So I bypassed the limit switch and just pay attention. I could write a book on this and have. Let me know if you encounter problems with the winch. You may wish to do the same. This is not a Forest River problem. It's a problem with the winch design...and virtually all brands use the same winch.

The black tank will last 5 days with a couple. It will fill faster with more users, of course. I'v'e discussed dealing with grey water. Last comes fresh water. Currently I carry 4 of these Reliance jugs, and I made an adapter using a spare cap, a 1/2" thread to 1/2" barb plastic adapter and about 15" of clear plastic hose and hose clamp--all from the local hardware store. I can dump from the jug to the fresh tank easily and stay dry. Between the fresh tank and the 28 gallons in jugs, I have water to spare after 5 days of boondocking.

If you're interested in going solar, let me know. I've been running solar for several years, and I never run out of battery. The only time I use the generator is to run 120 volt appliances like the microwave.

If you don't like your kitchen faucet, I bought this on Amazon and installed it without tools. The spigot comes off as it should. The levers are awesome compared to the round knobs because they work intuitively and stop water waste.

You need Need NEED a ladder. One of these fits just right in the entry way tucked around the dinette slide.

Your awning can be "rebagged." My bag deteriorated in the sun, but the awning inside is good as new. I paid $160 to have a boat canvas place make a new bag.
Tips on using the awning:
~ support poles vertical on the ground and staked...not in the sockets on the side of the camper;
~ use paracord and heavy duty stakes to guy the awning down to prevent wind damage;
~ be prepared to stow the awning in heavy wind or thunderstorms...you'll need the ladder and lots of determination;
~ When breaking camp, release the guy ropes then lower the roof FIRST then stow the awning...much easier.
~ this is a very tall camper, and even more so when lifted. I mentioned that I'm 6'6" and I'm on the top step of the ladder if I need to deal with the awning in wind!

This dry lube works wonders on the bed slides. Use a paper towel to protect from overspray, but it's clean and works great.


Brand new, these things cost about $16,000. If you adjust your expectations and realize that yanking a small house down the road over and over again...often over rough rural roads and dirt roads...is a super hard life for a camper, and that you didn't pay Airstream prices ($80K) for your rig, you'll love it. Just bring tools and some ingenuity and you'll have a great time.

Note: MOST of the links in the copy are just illustrations...not specific recommendations. Shop around a bit to get just the right stuff.
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previously 2014 Forest River/Rockwood HW 277
2006 Ram 1500 4WD Crew with Firestone Airbags
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:38 PM   #7
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Please excuse the typos. My "editor" got tired.
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Old 02-27-2019, 09:51 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jimmoore13 View Post
We have a 2014 HW 277.


SUPPORT YOUR FRESH TANK. SEE PHOTO. 26 gallons of water in a plastic jug under the camper will ruin the fresh tank if you travel full...which you often must do to boondock. My support is super easy: 1/2" galvanized water pipe, plywood, rubber mat, pipe clamps, and two clevis pins.
Just some info, my dealer said never to fill the tank over 3/4 full when traveling and make a mark on the tank so you know where to stop.

I recently was at the factory for repairs and the factory people also said not fill over 3/4 when traveling with it. They said the best thng to do is to leave it empty and to fill at the campground.

I always have filled until overflowing, both of my previous pop ups and both of my previous travel trailers.

I have read of water tank support failures on travel trailers so I always had the dealer inspect them (2 fresh water tanks, grey and black water tank in my Jayco Jay Flight 26BH) when I had my annual recaulking.

Not many place to go other than campgrounds around here so I'll likely just fill there since it also gives me more payload to put things on my roof rack.

Also watch out for that step ladder, it only supports 225 lbs. Most men I know are not that small, so it could be an accident waiting to happen.
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2019 Ford F150 Race Red XLT Sport, CC, 4WD, 145" WB, 3.5L Ecoboost, 10 speed, 3.55 Locking Axle, 1830# Payload, 12,700# Tow Rating, pulling a 2020 Rockwood Premier 2716G Pop Up, with a 14' box. Previously had 2012 Jayco Jay Flight 26BH and 2008 Jayco Jay Flight 19BH Travel Trailers. Also previously had 2007 Starcraft 2406 Pop Up with 12' box and bathroom, Previously had 2005 Rockwood 2290 Pop Up with 12' box and porta potty cabinet. Trucks and Trailers.
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Old 02-28-2019, 01:20 PM   #9
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Just some info, my dealer said never to fill the tank over 3/4 full when traveling and make a mark on the tank so you know where to stop.

<<SNIP>>

Also watch out for that step ladder, it only supports 225 lbs. Most men I know are not that small, so it could be an accident waiting to happen.
Definitely makes sense to NOT carry a full fresh tank if there's water at your destination or you know a safe place to get water near your destination. Since we boondock exclusively...never any hookups of any sort...that's not an option for us. The add-on support is very effective at supporting the heaviest part of the fresh tank when full. We also don't travel far...typically a maximum of less than 50 miles one way...and usually more like 20 miles one way. We are fortunate that some amazing camping is available very close to home - in the National Forest or along the shores of a high-mountain reservoir.

I agree about the ladder. It's not heavy-duty. But I've had good luck with this one. I'm 6'6" and weigh between 250 and 260 pounds (depending on what was for dinner last night), and I chose this one because it fits perfectly in the entry way...along side of the fire extinguisher with the top tucked around the slide and against the fridge. It can be one of the first things I take out of the camper. Since the camper is lifted (for rough terrain), I need the ladder just to make the rain flaps on the roof lift on the "downhill" side during setup. There's room between the slide and the stove/sink, but in my case, that space is occupied by a folding canopy. There's no space for the ladder there. But I imagine a bit of research would reveal a stronger ladder that's the same length when folded.

P.S. I have two extension ladders at home. The 24' fiberglass ladder is rated for 300#. The 20' aluminum ladder, now 18 years old, is rated for 225#. Again, no problems thus far, and I do this work every two years. See photo. That's not to say that it's wise to ignore the rating, but that the ratings are pretty conservative. And I never work on the aluminum ladder fully extended, while I DO work on the fiberglass ladder fully extended.
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Jim & Renee
2020 Jayco Jay Feather X-213
previously 2014 Forest River/Rockwood HW 277
2006 Ram 1500 4WD Crew with Firestone Airbags
Every weekend boondocking in the National Forests or at Lake Wellington
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Old 02-28-2019, 08:56 PM   #10
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To be honest, I was a bit disappointed that Forest River and the dealer didn't recommend the tank to carry it's full capacity. To me, that's deceiving saying it can carry 20 gallons then. My other pop ups carried their tanks full but I only had those campers a couple of years each. Maybe their supports wouldn't had lasted much after that.

Lately we haven't traveled far. Hek 50 miles is in my backyard, that's how far I travel to work everyday. A trip has got to be at least 100 miles away, a nice trip is around 300 miles away. But with a busy life the last few years, short, closer trips seem to be the standard, and few overall trips as well.

As for the weight rating, I do go by them as I had tent chairs, cots, and office chairs fail on me when only rated at 225# and I weigh 250 lbs. Seems 225# is a common rating for light duty items. In fact, I think their ratings are bloated because I've seen tent chairs fail with people just under their rating.

At work, we won't even stock ladders with a rating under 300 lbs, they're seen as unsafe. Glad everything has been working out for you.

"I need the ladder just to make the rain flaps on the roof lift on the "downhill" side during setup."

You did lose me on that, what is a rain flap on the roof? You're not talking about the awning are you?

BTW, nice campsite pics. Looks really nice!
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Old 03-01-2019, 05:30 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike91 View Post
<<SNIP>>

"I need the ladder just to make the rain flaps on the roof lift on the "downhill" side during setup."

You did lose me on that, what is a rain flap on the roof? You're not talking about the awning are you?

BTW, nice campsite pics. Looks really nice!
By rain flaps, I mean the canvas covers for the 4 roof lift posts. Once the roof is up, my posts have canvas covers that tuck under the roof slightly then velcro to the joint between the main tent and the tent ends. When at the lake, the shore side of the camper is almost always about 8" lower than the uphill side. Even at 6'6", with the HW and the lifted suspension, I'm always on the ladder to do the two shore side flaps.
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Jim & Renee
2020 Jayco Jay Feather X-213
previously 2014 Forest River/Rockwood HW 277
2006 Ram 1500 4WD Crew with Firestone Airbags
Every weekend boondocking in the National Forests or at Lake Wellington
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Old 03-01-2019, 08:32 PM   #12
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By rain flaps, I mean the canvas covers for the 4 roof lift posts. Once the roof is up, my posts have canvas covers that tuck under the roof slightly then velcro to the joint between the main tent and the tent ends. When at the lake, the shore side of the camper is almost always about 8" lower than the uphill side. Even at 6'6", with the HW and the lifted suspension, I'm always on the ladder to do the two shore side flaps.
Ok, got ya. Never called them anything but I agree, it's a stretch to fasten near the roof line. If you have a drop on one side of the camper, I see the need for a step ladder.
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2019 Ford F150 Race Red XLT Sport, CC, 4WD, 145" WB, 3.5L Ecoboost, 10 speed, 3.55 Locking Axle, 1830# Payload, 12,700# Tow Rating, pulling a 2020 Rockwood Premier 2716G Pop Up, with a 14' box. Previously had 2012 Jayco Jay Flight 26BH and 2008 Jayco Jay Flight 19BH Travel Trailers. Also previously had 2007 Starcraft 2406 Pop Up with 12' box and bathroom, Previously had 2005 Rockwood 2290 Pop Up with 12' box and porta potty cabinet. Trucks and Trailers.
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Old 03-03-2019, 11:41 AM   #13
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Thanks to everyone who has replied. I have got some great tips for improvements as well as set up tips. I raised the top yesterday only to find out it wouldn’t lower. I used a drill to lower the roof until troubleshooting. I noticed a switch in the roof that contacts the top edge when closed. What is the function/purpose of this switch. Thanks all for the great response.
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Old 03-03-2019, 05:40 PM   #14
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Thanks to everyone who has replied. I have got some great tips for improvements as well as set up tips. I raised the top yesterday only to find out it wouldn’t lower. I used a drill to lower the roof until troubleshooting. I noticed a switch in the roof that contacts the top edge when closed. What is the function/purpose of this switch. Thanks all for the great response.
If it's a plunger switch (push button), that switch is intended to disable a number of features when the roof is closed...e.g. lights, furnace, etc.

Mine failed "on" yeas ago. I didn't bother to replace it. I always turn off the furnace at the thermostat before closing up...I have a checklist.
I replaced the light bulbs with LEDs soon after purchase. Yours probably already has LEDs. Incandescent bulbs can get pretty hot and start a fire if you leave the lights on by accident.

I don't recommend going without the switch...it's a good safety interlock. I don't know why mine disintegrated, but since it failed in the "on" position, I'm good without it.
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Jim & Renee
2020 Jayco Jay Feather X-213
previously 2014 Forest River/Rockwood HW 277
2006 Ram 1500 4WD Crew with Firestone Airbags
Every weekend boondocking in the National Forests or at Lake Wellington
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