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Old 07-03-2019, 01:37 PM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MentallyRetired View Post
We had a popup for 8 years. When we sold it, the end looked as good as new. The secret:
You normally leave a campsite in the morning and often there is dew on the canvas ends. If store the camper with the dew on the canvas you get mold. To avoid the mold, when you get home, set up the camper again an leave it set up until you are sure it is dry inside and out then fold it up for storage.
Agreed. Basic simple actions that take a few minutes really extend the life of many things.

This is my first tent camper but I have been camping in a tent for many many years. Making sure the tent is dry and clean when put away and it will serve you for years and years to come.

I am finding out that these campers with Fiberglass roof should be covered at all times when not in use though to preserve the integrity of the roof.....
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Old 07-05-2019, 02:14 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by IchLiebeBier View Post
Our first camper was a 2516G. Loved it, but we quickly outgrew it. But I loved camping in that thing. Even more than a travel trailer.

I have three pieces of advice right off the bat for you:

1. Get yourself a BAL light trailer tire leveler and a pizza bag to store it in. Makes leveling super easy.

2. Make a checklist for setting the thing up. There is likely a sequence for setting it up without causing a problem. IIRC, I had to pull the dinette canvas out first (without pulling out the dinette) so that when I pulled out the bed, it wouldn't grab and rip the canvas. Simple things like that you want to remember to do in the right order.

3. Don't ever, ever store it with a wet canvas.

Other than that, pretty simple to handle overall. I think you'll really, really enjoy it. The first time you camp and realize you woke up warm and dry you'll be hooked.

Have fun.

EDIT: I just looked and I still have my checklist. Let me know if you'd like to see it and I'll try to post it.
I would like your checklist please.
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Old 07-05-2019, 05:07 PM   #63
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Well here you go...

These were for a 2006 Trailer, so some things may have changed. Since it was my first trailer, I made it very detailed. Maybe too detailed.

At the time, I printed it out and kept it in checklist sleeves. Now, I used OneNote on my phone. It makes it easier to check them off as I go.

Hope it helps.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Camper Checklists_pop up.pdf (45.8 KB, 36 views)
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:16 AM   #64
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Long boondocking ideas

*Get three of the blue cube 7 gallon water containers to refill the popup’s tank occasionally from a local source. (Carry them empty inside the camper.) Use your drinking water hose and gravity to drain them into the popup’s tank. Get a fitting from Home Depot with a male hose connection at one end to replace the spigot on one of the containers’ caps. Get an activated carbon in-line water filter for the hose (run water through it before first use).
*Get the $149 100-watt solar kit from Harbor Freight - it has a charge controller to protect your batteries. You won’t need a generator - - your neighbors will thank you. Lay the panels on the camper roof before raising it.
*A good, flush-type porta-potti and a spring-steel-support (instant-up) small but tall tent shelter to hold it.
*Two inexpensive plastic 9-10’ sit-in kayaks and life jackets. Install two roof rails on the camper to carry them. (Make sure the roof rail supports are screwed firmly into the wood around the edge of the camper roof.)
*Canned food and dried food (rice, pasta) and a very good five-day cooler for other food. The fridge is tiny.
*Start a checklist of required camping items now on a computer spreadsheet - update, print and consult before each trip.
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:19 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by Bob380 View Post
*Get three of the blue cube 7 gallon water containers to refill the popup’s tank occasionally from a local source. (Carry them empty inside the camper.) Use your drinking water hose and gravity to drain them into the popup’s tank. Get a fitting from Home Depot with a male hose connection at one end to replace the spigot on one of the containers’ caps. Get an activated carbon in-line water filter for the hose (run water through it before first use).
*Get the $149 100-watt solar kit from Harbor Freight - it has a charge controller to protect your batteries. You won’t need a generator - - your neighbors will thank you. Lay the panels on the camper roof before raising it.
*A good, flush-type porta-potti and a spring-steel-support (instant-up) small but tall tent shelter to hold it.
*Two inexpensive plastic 9-10’ sit-in kayaks and life jackets. Install two roof rails on the camper to carry them. (Make sure the roof rail supports are screwed firmly into the wood around the edge of the camper roof.)
*Canned food and dried food (rice, pasta) and a very good five-day cooler for other food. The fridge is tiny.
*Start a checklist of required camping items now on a computer spreadsheet - update, print and consult before each trip.
I would caveat the notion of putting the solar panels on the roof before raising it with the caution that in high wind areas they could get tossed off with the right gust
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:36 AM   #66
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Good point - that certainly could happen in a strong wind, although it hasn’t to us — maybe lay a rope over them before the roof goes up, then tie them down? I like them on the roof for good exposure to the sun all day (and less likelihood of “disappearing” if they’re out on the ground). Dealers choice.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:32 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by Bob380 View Post
Good point - that certainly could happen in a strong wind, although it hasn’t to us — maybe lay a rope over them before the roof goes up, then tie them down? I like them on the roof for good exposure to the sun all day (and less likelihood of “disappearing” if they’re out on the ground). Dealers choice.
Agreed, I would prefer them on the roof as well if I had some. I would just hate for someone to take advice I gave but not consider the consequences in certain situations.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:48 PM   #68
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Duct tape! Actually I have roof racks so I could tie it down. I have the panel laying on top of the camper right now (folded down) connected to the batteries. Visiting family and there's no place to plug in the shore line, so I connected the solar panel. Took about 8 hrs to bring the batteries up to full and the panel has been maintaining a full charge since (trickle charging via the solar controller).
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Old 07-10-2019, 08:28 PM   #69
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HappyCamperCanada, there are no stupid questions. We have graduated from tent camping, to a small surfer van, to two pop-up tent trailers, two Travel Trailers, and now our luxurious Fifth-Wheel Trailer. You are on a journey that will bring you a lifetime of fond memories, and we wish you all the best.

My only advice to you would be to stay out of "bear country" unless you have a safe, secure, bear-proof container in which to keep your food and drinks. Make sure it does not resemble an actual cooler. Bears here in California know exactly what a cooler looks like, and will tear through canvas, or steel and glass tailgates, to get at a cooler.

Keep no food items in your trailer, especially at night. Bears will almost always forage at night, and their acute sense of smell will lead them to even the tiniest left-over piece of cracker or popcorn or salami or cheese or whatever.

Good luck with your new rig, and stay safe.
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