RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-06-2020, 09:02 AM   #81
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by daggles View Post
Heading into our 8th summer with our 2009 Rockwood Freedom pop up and still love it. I do daydream of a larger hard panel trailer but that would involve a bigger tow vehicle (we currently have a Honda Pilot). The Honda towed the pop up through the Canadian Rockies with ease and the trailer takes up half my garage for 50 weeks of the year.
We love sleeping in the pop up but when itís cold out, itís a cold sleep and the early morning bathroom breaks do get tiring; why canít kids go to the bathroom at the same time?!
I am going to do some research on some of the lightweight TTís mentioned in this string.
Cheers
We bought wool blankets and put them between the bed and the word as an insulated barrier and it makes such a big difference
Marge221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2020, 12:19 PM   #82
Senior Member
 
vinmaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 1,824
I own a pop up because I love the openness of it when the flaps are all open and the wind is blowing through it. Nothing compares IMHO.


But I think the migration away from pop ups is simply due to the enormous wealth that has been created during this last generation. Many of us here had parents who bought pop ups because of low cost and easy towing and frankly a bit more frugality than exists today. Today people are just not interested in any entry level type anything. We all want the fully loaded item whether it is a house, car, or phone.



Just ask yourself if your current tow vehicle cost more than your parent's first house?



The manufacturers are just building what people want. And they want fully loaded RV's.



Vin.
__________________

2015 HW296
2006 HW256 (previous pup)
2013 Chevy Tahoe
Equalizer WDH 10000#
vinmaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2020, 12:56 PM   #83
RV There Yet?
 
IsleDog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Winona, MN
Posts: 828
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinmaker View Post
I own a pop up because I love the openness of it when the flaps are all open and the wind is blowing through it. Nothing compares IMHO.


But I think the migration away from pop ups is simply due to the enormous wealth that has been created during this last generation. Many of us here had parents who bought pop ups because of low cost and easy towing and frankly a bit more frugality than exists today. Today people are just not interested in any entry level type anything. We all want the fully loaded item whether it is a house, car, or phone.



Just ask yourself if your current tow vehicle cost more than your parent's first house?



The manufacturers are just building what people want. And they want fully loaded RV's.



Vin.
we LOVED our popup for this reason alone! towing was great, same with storage. but setting in in the rain sucks. we bought a small entry level toy hauler (under 22 ft) and have the screen for the back. not quite as good, but on nice days its amazing! and our ac is much better. no dampness anymore, which makes my wife happy and that makes me happy.
__________________
2018 17RP
2009 Crew Cab King Ranch F150 "Goose"
IsleDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2020, 02:21 PM   #84
Site Team
 
bikendan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 23,821
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinmaker View Post
I own a pop up because I love the openness of it when the flaps are all open and the wind is blowing through it. Nothing compares IMHO.


But I think the migration away from pop ups is simply due to the enormous wealth that has been created during this last generation. Many of us here had parents who bought pop ups because of low cost and easy towing and frankly a bit more frugality than exists today. Today people are just not interested in any entry level type anything. We all want the fully loaded item whether it is a house, car, or phone.



Just ask yourself if your current tow vehicle cost more than your parent's first house?



The manufacturers are just building what people want. And they want fully loaded RV's.



Vin.
I agree. I think younger buyers want more amenities. Look how popular the newer tricked out small trailers are, like Geo/E Pro or No Boundaries. They have lot of modern tech in them, like WiFi boosters, USB ports, inverters and other amenities never seen before, in small trailers like these.
And they cost about the same as a popup.
__________________
Dan-Retired California Firefighter/EMT
Shawn-Musician/Entrepreneur/Wine Expert
and Zoe the Wonder Dog(R.I.P.)
2016 PrimeTime TracerAIR 255, pushing a 2014 Ford F150 SCREW XTR 4x4 3.5 Ecoboost w/Max Tow Package
4pt Equal-i-zer WDH and 1828lbs of payload capacity
bikendan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2020, 06:44 PM   #85
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 14
I live in a subdivision and wanted something I could store in the garage. Storage places around here are through the roof.

With those length and height restrictions, my wife's requirement of a bathroom, and our budget, we arrived at the Rockwood Highwall 277.

Looking around, the closest one was at Gander Outdoors in Marion, Illinois. That is a five hour each way drive. Our local Camping World doesn't sell pop-ups, they even told me they can't get parts for mine which is going to be hard on them since they have to honor our warranty. At any rate, I drove to Illinois and bought it. The dealership was clueless about the features of a pop-up, I had watched a few YouTube videos and knew more.

I don't know if dealers think they can make more money off hardsides or what, but it is sad they aren't better represented. Forget costs and all, they better suite some people's needs.
geojag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2020, 07:28 PM   #86
Senior Member
 
rsdata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Northern KY
Posts: 4,215
Quote:
Forget costs and all, they better suite some people's needs.
I started with a popup, and 5 years later got a hybrid after proving to the wife she could enjoy camping. THe only reason we changed was getting older required a better bathroom and wanted a little easier packing/unpacking then we had with the popup.

Dealers don't want to deal with them because a trailer makes more profit then a popup at about the same storage size on the lot.
__________________
"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. " - Ronald Reagan
ďToo much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.Ē Ė Mark Twain

2014 Shamrock 183
2014 RAM 1500 Bighorn Crew Cab, HEMI, 3.21 gears, 8 Spd, 4X4 TST TPMS
rsdata is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2020, 08:19 PM   #87
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 9
Hw277

Quote:
Originally Posted by geojag View Post
I live in a subdivision and wanted something I could store in the garage. Storage places around here are through the roof.

With those length and height restrictions, my wife's requirement of a bathroom, and our budget, we arrived at the Rockwood Highwall 277.

Looking around, the closest one was at Gander Outdoors in Marion, Illinois. That is a five hour each way drive. Our local Camping World doesn't sell pop-ups, they even told me they can't get parts for mine which is going to be hard on them since they have to honor our warranty. At any rate, I drove to Illinois and bought it. The dealership was clueless about the features of a pop-up, I had watched a few YouTube videos and knew more.

I don't know if dealers think they can make more money off hardsides or what, but it is sad they aren't better represented. Forget costs and all, they better suite some people's needs.
We have the same one ! I love it so much room and storage !! And with 6 grandkids they all fit comfortably. Hubby wants a5th wheel but Iíll never get rid of this one.
Marge221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2020, 07:42 AM   #88
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 2,403
One factor is that the couples without kids have moved into A-frames instead of the conventional pop-up. I'll bet if you counted the A-frames and pop-ups together, they are still as popular as ever.

We still needed the store-in-the-garage that comes with a PUP, but wanted the simpler camping life of an A-frame. But A-frames don't work very well for a family unless the kids sleep in a separate tent.

But in reality, our kids moved into their own tents when they were teenagers. We no longer needed the expanse of an expanded pop-up. Nevertheless, it was a tough decision to move to an A-frame. As open and airy as an A-frame tries to be, it doesn't compare to a pop-up.

But after 6 years, we have adapted to A-frame camping. 3-4 days trips are the norm instead of the week+ in the pop-up, and an overnight is practical because of the quick setup and take down. We keep the A-frame ready to go - we can be gone in 2 hours after making the decision. When we decide to go, pack food, clothes, hook up the A-frame, and go.

We tried to get there with the pop-up, but between kids and the longer setups, and no garage back then to store it in, it just didn't work as well.

Fred W
2019 Flagstaff T21TBHW A-frame
prev 2014 Rockwood A122 A-frame
prev 2000 Coleman Westlake PUP
prev 1987 Coachmen 10ft PUP
camping Colorado and adjacent states one weekend at a time
prev trip Black Hills, Badlands, Ft Robinson, Scott's Bluff
next trip Navajo Lake
pgandw is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2020, 08:19 AM   #89
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 430
We move from a tent to a PUP about 67 years ago. Then moved to a hybrid this year. We loved the PUP. It was luxury compared to tenting. There were two drawbacks to the PUP that helped us decide to go to the "darkside".
1) Set up/tear down time. For trips that require an overnight on the way we lost 2 hours of drive time for each intermediate stop. Not only is there the set up time, but we used the floor of the PUP for storage when traveling. We had to unpack it each time we wanted to use it. Then pack everything back up before departing. The Roo takes 15 min to open up once we are parked.
2) Moving parts. The PUP had more moving parts than our Roo19 we currently have. The lift system and bunk slides always bothered me. PUPs are made to be inexpensive. The components are not as robust as I would like. I was especially annoyed when I had to replace my lift cable the night before a trip. I was laying in the street while it was raining. The cable failed right at the winch drum. The only moving parts on the Roo are the hinges of the bunks.

While I miss the airiness of the PUP the hybrid comes close. The bunks open up the same. The extra storage that can be accessed without having to pop anything up is great.

Smaller hybrids are not that much more money than a nice PUP either. I miss the PUP but it no longer fit our mission.
__________________
Hobienick

2020 Rockwood Roo 19
2012 F150 SuperCrew Ecoboost
hobienick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:13 PM.