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Old 04-05-2019, 10:05 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by nomad297 View Post
nayther,

I’m not saying you’re wrong, but I don’t understand what you are saying in the portion of your post I quoted above. Can you explain it for me, please?

When it comes to pipe and tubing sizes or plumbing, they are still the same as with any other use/trade. Tubing size is designated by OD and pipe is designated by ID. Both have nominal ID sizes depending on the wall thickness, type “M” being the thinnest, type “L” being thicker than “M” and type “K” being thicker than type “L”.

Hard copper pipe is used for natural gas and propane installations, as well as soft copper tube, but not as commonly as soft copper tube. The biggest difference when using hard pipe instead of soft tube is that all joints are silver soldered (or ProPressed). The minimum wall thickness of this pipe is type “L”. The advantage to using hard copper pipe with silver soldered joints instead of soft copper tube with flared joints is, the silver soldered joints of a hard copper pipe installation can be permanently concealed, where any flared joints must be readily accessible

All copper pipe sizes of types “K” and “L” can be obtained as soft (annealed) copper tube. If you were to use this soft copper tube for a gas installation, you would be silver soldering all joints, using ordinary copper water pipe fittings. You would not be using flare fittings until you reduce down to the standard copper tube sizes that will accept flare fittings, and where these fittings can be made readily accessible — usually at the connection point of whatever you are supplying gas to.

Bruce

Not correct. There is no "ID" on tubing or pipe. I defy you to pick up a piece of 1/2" copper water pipe, type L, M, or K and show me a 1/2" dimension. The ID vary depending on the schedule (K is thickest, therefore will have the smallest ID, M is thinnest and will have the largest ID). If this were not the case then each would require specific fittings. Same for iron and steel pipe.



Here's an example on steel pipe:
1/2" sched. 40 steel is .622" id, .840" OD with a wall thickness of .109". Sched. 80 steel is .546" id .840" OD with wall thickness of .147". Both use the same fittings.


Copper is the same, I just don't have a dimension sheet handy right now. I've been a mechanical contractor for 40+ years, we mostly do copper piping for water and refrigeration so that's my life. Where it gets tricky is specifying refrigerant piping vs. water; however they still use the same fittings.
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Old 04-05-2019, 10:36 AM   #22
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Both right!

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Originally Posted by nayther View Post
Not correct. There is no "ID" on tubing or pipe. I defy you to pick up a piece of 1/2" copper water pipe, type L, M, or K and show me a 1/2" dimension. The ID vary depending on the schedule (K is thickest, therefore will have the smallest ID, M is thinnest and will have the largest ID). If this were not the case then each would require specific fittings. Same for iron and steel pipe.

Here's an example on steel pipe:
1/2" sched. 40 steel is .622" id, .840" OD with a wall thickness of .109". Sched. 80 steel is .546" id .840" OD with wall thickness of .147". Both use the same fittings.

Copper is the same, I just don't have a dimension sheet handy right now. I've been a mechanical contractor for 40+ years, we mostly do copper piping for water and refrigeration so that's my life. Where it gets tricky is specifying refrigerant piping vs. water; however they still use the same fittings.
Nayther, there's no disagreement here. Bruce (Nomad297) wrote "nominal ID." "Nominal" means "name." And you are both saying that 1/2" K, L, and M are named 1/2", even though their IDs vary.

Larry
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:28 AM   #23
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Nayther, there's no disagreement here. Bruce (Nomad297) wrote "nominal ID." "Nominal" means "name." And you are both saying that 1/2" K, L, and M are named 1/2", even though their IDs vary.

Larry
Exactly. I thought what I wrote made that very clear. You need to understand the differences between pipe and tube, hard and soft, and the intended use of each. All of this makes a difference.

For example, if you wanted to buy a compression shutoff/angle/straight stop for your toilet, and your house is piped using copper, you, as a homeowner/handyman would need a 1/2”x3/8” shutoff. But you could also refer to it as 5/8”x3/8”. You will see them labeled as 1/2”x3/8” at most home centers and hardware stores, but you will see them labeled as 5/8”x3/8” at most plumbing supply houses — they are the same thing. Most homeowners can work out that the copper coming through the wall or floor is 1/2”, so they are labeled this way at home centers and hardware stores for simplicity. However, the professional way of identifying and purchasing compression (and flare) fittings is by their OD, so since 1/2” copper has an OD of 5/8”, and the hookup supply size for most toilets has an OD of 3/8”, the shutoff you buy at the plumbing supply house will be labeled as “5/8”x3/8”. Go to Home Depot and tell them you need a 5/8”x3/8” angle stop and they will tell you they don’t have them. Ask for it at a plumbing supply house and they will ask you what finish you want it in.

I really do know what I am talking about and my head is spinning from trying to explain this without getting frustrated. I think I have reached the point where I don’t care to explain it anymore.

Bruce
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:52 AM   #24
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I solved that issue by moving the propane tank tray a couple of inches or so rearward. The tray is held in place with a few self-tapping screws and easily relocated. I sealed up the old holes with some caulk. Easy peasy...
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Old 04-05-2019, 12:24 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by nomad297 View Post
Exactly. I thought what I wrote made that very clear. You need to understand the differences between pipe and tube, hard and soft, and the intended use of each. All of this makes a difference.

For example, if you wanted to buy a compression shutoff/angle/straight stop for your toilet, and your house is piped using copper, you, as a homeowner/handyman would need a 1/2x3/8 shutoff. But you could also refer to it as 5/8x3/8. You will see them labeled as 1/2x3/8 at most home centers and hardware stores, but you will see them labeled as 5/8x3/8 at most plumbing supply houses they are the same thing. Most homeowners can work out that the copper coming through the wall or floor is 1/2, so they are labeled this way at home centers and hardware stores for simplicity. However, the professional way of identifying and purchasing compression (and flare) fittings is by their OD, so since 1/2 copper has an OD of 5/8, and the hookup supply size for most toilets has an OD of 3/8, the shutoff you buy at the plumbing supply house will be labeled as 5/8x3/8. Go to Home Depot and tell them you need a 5/8x3/8 angle stop and they will tell you they dont have them. Ask for it at a plumbing supply house and they will ask you what finish you want it in.

I really do know what I am talking about and my head is spinning from trying to explain this without getting frustrated. I think I have reached the point where I dont care to explain it anymore.

Bruce
Really... just posting on a forum does that to you?
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Old 04-05-2019, 01:51 PM   #26
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I think it is too many sentences for a simple explanation. Try this, tubing is actual size on the OD, pipe is nominal size on the ID but constant on the OD.

I have been a general engineering and general building contractor for many years too and I have never seen hard copper used for propane in this state, they use threaded black iron pipe and the joints do not have to be exposed. Gastite fittings are a form of compression and can be hidden in a wall also.
I only know of one type of pipe that has different OD for the same nominal size and that is transite also dubbed ACP.
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Old 04-05-2019, 03:18 PM   #27
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I think it is too many sentences for a simple explanation. Try this, tubing is actual size on the OD, pipe is nominal size on the ID but constant on the OD.
It is not that simple. Your statement is incomplete/inaccurate. You are forgetting about the differences of ID of some tubing as I described.

Bruce
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Old 04-05-2019, 03:46 PM   #28
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Whew, the OP's head must be spinning at this point.
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:52 PM   #29
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Same problem here, and I boondock exclusively, so a second battery would be wonderful. Thanks for the guidance and shame on Forest River for cutting corners to save 50 cents.
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Old 04-06-2019, 01:07 AM   #30
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Soooo....in continuing with the ID, OD conversation, Forest River said it's an 1/2" OD fitting. So I'm going to purchase the buckhead union that 5picker posted. Hopefully everything works.

Thanks for the help.
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Old 04-06-2019, 04:29 AM   #31
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Whew, the OP's head must be spinning at this point.
Oh, no! Now you have introduced OP to the ID/OD debate. This is going to begin to get complicated.

Bruce
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Old 04-06-2019, 07:37 AM   #32
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Lol. I am the "original poster". And yes...I have no idea of what the other guys are talking about. Lol
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Old 04-16-2019, 02:03 AM   #33
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Don't forget adding extra battery is going to change tongue weight. Adjust hitch accordingly.
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Old 04-16-2019, 02:37 AM   #34
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Jim is there a video somewhere that shows how to adjust the tongue? The two 6V batteries are probably about 100 lbs more than the original 12V battery.
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