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Old 06-02-2017, 02:08 PM   #1
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Tire blowout damaged wiring

Had a tire blowout in my 2014 Flagstaff MAC 206ST. The force and treads smacked the plastic wheel cover loose and dragged down most of the wires that were feeding into my camper's converter box (WFCO 8735) and pulled them out from their destinations, e.g. refrigerator, lights and/or galley triggered light switch, roof fan, and water pump.

There are five long wires that I have to figure out where they went and somehow snake them back. Here is all the info I was able to get out of a Forest River representative:

black & white (fridge), red & white (water pump), blue & white, green & white (porch light), white & white (ceiling light kill switch under the sink)

My main question at the moment is how do the blue and white and green and white wires go from the converter box area (under the dinette seat) to their destinations (and I only have one "porch" light). I am hoping they do not attach to splices within the walls.

If anyone has a high definition picture of the converter box area of their 206ST showing how each color wire leaves the vicinity, that would be extremely helpful.
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:55 PM   #2
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Blowout Mayhem

I have the exact same trailer and just experienced the same thing 40 miles from Lander, Wyoming on the way to eclipse camping.

The first issue was that I couldn't find a lug wrench on the trailer to deal with the blown tire. The nuts are seated deeply on the tire bolts, my jeep's lug nut wrench would not seat on them. So the lesson learned is to carry a proper lug wrench for situations like this in the middle of nowhere! Thankfully a rancher pulled over and had the proper tool.

I'm taking my trailer to the shop tomorrow. In my case, the tire blew through the cheap plastic (Stapled!) wheel well cover, and it looks like a bomb went off inside the cabinet under the sink. There is extensive wire and pipe damage. The gas line to the heater was pulled to within 6 inches of the ground, the outlet next to the fuse box was pulled through the cabinetry, and of course I lost a bunch of systems; sink, shower, heater, water heater, water pump, toilet flush. In addition, two drawers don't work any more either.

So what was your experience in straightening everything out? Easy? Difficult?

I'm glad these guys don't design airplanes! ..but they could learn from airplane design. Running all of the systems down one side of the trailer makes everything vulnerable. At the very least, they could use metal wheel well covers instead of plastic. But maybe they want to keep the dealer service center busy by designing vulnerability into the trailer, lol. I hope you got yours fixed ok.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:01 PM   #3
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Really sorry to hear about your situation.
Can't be much help but as to say, the green and white should be a ground and the blue and white should be a hot.
Wish I could help more.
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Old 08-22-2017, 07:28 PM   #4
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Thanks.

Apparently I have a $100 deductible on the trailer, and it "appears" that I'm covered for the damage. I'll keep a running commentary -including the estimated repair cost- on this forum.

I guess I could Google it, but does anyone know of aftermarket wheel well covers that are more protective? Such as metal and screwed in instead of stapled?
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Old 08-22-2017, 10:20 PM   #5
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Tell me about your blowouts. How old were the tires? Were they inflated to 65psi? Was a it a hot day while towing after a long distance? I have only owned my trailer since June, and I am concerned as it appears blowouts are common in the trailer world. I also noticed that there is no protection, other than the light, molded, plastic tire well. I am sure that shatters almost immediately with a blowout and then everything in the cabinet gets shredded. Makes me wonder why Forest River does not build a wooden or aluminum box over the tire well to protect the contents of the trailer.
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Old 08-23-2017, 09:35 AM   #6
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The tires were four years old with good tread. I was going about 70-75 mph and it was 85 degrees out, at 8000'. Max PSI is 50, I had them at 45. I've probably put 5-6,000 miles on these tires. Like the battery on the trailer, it's obvious that the tires were supplied by the lowest bidder. Of course in hindsight, I should have had them replaced much sooner, but as I said, the tread is fine. -And who knows, maybe I ran over something and the tires were otherwise fine. I think you're absolutely right about encasing the wheel area in a box or something. It would have made a huge difference. The wires sticking out of the end of the rubber of a shredded steel belted radial act like a scythe towards wire, pipe, etc.
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Old 08-23-2017, 09:58 AM   #7
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There have been a thread or two recently about adding better wheel well liners to RV's.

One thing to look at are utility trailer fenders. They're made of metal and should help with this kind of damage.
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Old 08-23-2017, 10:42 AM   #8
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When you get her all fixed up, go ahead and put some Goodyear Endurance tires on there. They're a few bucks more, but you will feel better rolling down the road.
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Old 08-23-2017, 10:45 AM   #9
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I was going about 70-75 mph
ST trailer tires are typically speed rated for 65MPH.
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Old 08-23-2017, 10:47 AM   #10
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When you get her all fixed up, go ahead and put some Goodyear Endurance tires on there. They're a few bucks more, but you will feel better rolling down the road.
Doesn't the OP have 13" inch wheels? As far as I know, Goodyear Endurance doesn't go down to 13".
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Old 08-23-2017, 11:08 AM   #11
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The tires were four years old with good tread. I was going about 70-75 mph and it was 85 degrees out, at 8000'. Max PSI is 50, I had them at 45.
Granted, there may have been a road hazard. But load range "C" tires are not rated for that kind of speed!
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Old 08-23-2017, 11:16 AM   #12
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The first issue was that I couldn't find a lug wrench on the trailer to deal with the blown tire. The nuts are seated deeply on the tire bolts, my jeep's lug nut wrench would not seat on them. So the lesson learned is to carry a proper lug wrench for situations like this in the middle of nowhere!
First tool that went into my new trailer was a brand new 4-Way Lug Wrench.

I also dug up my old 1/2" drive Electric Impact wrench with and impact socket and extension that fits my lug nuts. That sits in the back of my pickup right next to the generator. If I have to change a tire alongside the road I want to do it quick. Nothing like pushing the button to start the generator and using the electric wrench to change the tire.

Since I already had the 120v Impact Wrench I passed on buying a Cordless Version. With my luck the battery would be dead
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Old 08-23-2017, 11:37 AM   #13
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Problem with electric torque wrenches, people actually use them to install the lug nuts and don't use a torque bar with the impact wrench. What you really should do is install by hand and use a torque wrench but how many people carry torque wrenches with them.
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Old 08-23-2017, 12:01 PM   #14
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I personally have NEVER tightened a lug with a torque wrench.

But I agree, you should slow down pulling your camper. Especially pulling with a Jeep.
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Old 08-23-2017, 12:23 PM   #15
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Problem with electric torque wrenches, people actually use them to install the lug nuts and don't use a torque bar with the impact wrench. What you really should do is install by hand and use a torque wrench but how many people carry torque wrenches with them.
After 36 years in the Tire/Auto Service Industry I think I have a handle on it. I'm one of those that does carry a torque wrench. Use it regularly on my TV too.

FWIW, Electric Impact wrenches are a lot more limited in torque output than the air wrenches used in Tire Shops.

Another good practice is to carry a few brand new lug nuts. If you start to install a lug nut by hand (which should be done even if using the impact wrench) and it doesn't go on easily, replace it with one of the new lug nuts. Even if installing them with a 4-Way threads can be damaged. Remember that most people don't replace the lug nuts on the same stud they removed them from but just randomly. If the lug nut feels tight when installing it with your fingers, it's probably not going to get looser when you use any kind of wrench.
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Old 08-23-2017, 02:03 PM   #16
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I personally have NEVER tightened a lug with a torque wrench.
I have 5 different high quality torque wrenches that I use on everything I work on and YES, they always get used on lug nuts.
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Old 08-24-2017, 10:36 AM   #17
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Granted, there may have been a road hazard. But load range "C" tires are not rated for that kind of speed!
I guess I learn something new every day! I generally set the cruise control at 65-70, and hit 75 to pass. I never did see a speed limitation on the tires, just a psi limit. I live in Utah, and have taken many road trips out to the Oregon Coast, Yosemite, Moab, Yellowstone etc., over the years driving at these speeds, this is the first time a flat has reared it's ugly head.
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Old 08-24-2017, 10:37 AM   #18
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...And the grand total for repairs is...$2900!
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Old 08-24-2017, 02:13 PM   #19
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I guess I learn something new every day! I generally set the cruise control at 65-70, and hit 75 to pass. I never did see a speed limitation on the tires, just a psi limit. I live in Utah, and have taken many road trips out to the Oregon Coast, Yosemite, Moab, Yellowstone etc., over the years driving at these speeds, this is the first time a flat has reared it's ugly head.

My brand new Flagstaff Micro-Lite has Castle Rock tires on it and it also has a clear speed limit of 75 Mph molded into the side of the tire in fairly large letters.



The tires are "Load Range C" with a Speed Rating of "L" or max speed rating of 75 MPH as shown.

My tow vehicle has more than enough HP to tow my trailer at regular freeway speeds and even climb hills at speeds much faster than others towing similar loads. In my years I have learned though that it takes a lot more fuel to tow at 70 mph than it does at 55-60 which puts me close to the max speed for towing in just about every state. Difference in fuel consumption? At 75 mph I get 8 mgp. At 55 I get 11 mpg. (averages). The faster speed only gets me to my day's destination a little bit sooner but keeping at the legal speed I put leave money in my pocket from fuel I don't have to buy and it's a lot easier on the equipment.

In my upcoming trip of 4,000 miles that means 136 gallons of gasoline not purchased and perhaps a tire or two that won't fail.

I find it hard to lay blame on tire manufacturers for tire failures when they clearly label their product with it's limitations and people pretty much ignore them. Won't really make any difference which country a tire is made if it's abused.
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Old 08-24-2017, 03:58 PM   #20
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My brand new trailer has those Castle Rock tires on it. I am going to take them off and sell them within a few weeks.
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