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Old 12-11-2016, 10:13 AM   #1
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Winter camping in a Pop Up

Hi all Ė I have a 2016 Rockwood High Wall and I love it. I like to camp year round and I was wondering how cold is too cold for the canvas? What should I look out for when winter camping?
I have the camper winterized and donít use the water or sink in the winter.
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Old 12-11-2016, 01:03 PM   #2
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First thing you need to do is get Popup Gizmos and Reflectix.
That's a basic things for camping in cold weather with a popup or hybrid.
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Old 12-12-2016, 06:45 AM   #3
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Thank you, this was some good information.

Merry Christmas.
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Old 12-12-2016, 01:24 PM   #4
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Merry Christmas to you too!🎄
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Old 12-12-2016, 09:00 PM   #5
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This is all good info and something I will invest in (Christmas presents). When it comes to winter camping zero degrees would not stop me, but is it too cold for the canvas or anything else in the camper?
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Old 12-12-2016, 09:18 PM   #6
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Burrr

I use a popup slide in truck camper.

It has vinyl sidewalls for the "popup" part.

Those vinyl walls have ZERO insulation qualities.
I near froze in 25 degree temps INSIDE the camper one morning.

I use a heavy, below zero rated sleeping bag and was fine at night.
But when the body screams......"get me outta here"....it was a tough go.

Immediately and before any body functions are taken care of, the stove is fired off under a percolator coffee pot. Inside temps rise quickly to a barely tolerable range.

The vinyl is tough and thick with no ill effects whatsoever from the below freezing cold.
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Old 12-12-2016, 09:23 PM   #7
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I always carry Grabber reflective tarps when tent camping. Shiny side in when cold, shiny side out when hot. I hang them inside up along the walls and put on the floor.

They work so well that I use them in winter in my house, too. I clip them over the windows when it is in the teens and colder. Really makes a difference. I also use them over the windows in the TT.

Mine were bought on sale at Walmart for about $7, but it is worth the warmth at double the price.

https://www.amazon.com/Grabber-12700.../dp/B00PUHY3TC
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Old 12-13-2016, 11:52 AM   #8
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From tent and canvas pop-up winter (and all season) camping experience, ignoring condensation is the biggest boo-boo. You simply have to keep the vent at least cracked open to get rid of the condensation. And some limited form of intake air to cross-ventilate.


In my Coleman pop-up, I had to partially unzip the end canvas to form vents over the bunks to stop the condensation in the ends when camping in the Sierras, even in the summer. Yes, you will lose some heat out the vents. But that's better than waking up to sleeping in puddles - has happened to me in tents in the snow in the Sierras.


The bigger the temp change from day to night, the bigger the condensation issue will be.


I set the thermostat on the heater at 50 degrees - warm enough to sleep decently, but cool enough to not run the heater all the time. The standard 80AH battery is good for running the heater for about 8 hours, and very little else. You need more battery(ies) or an alternate heat source if you want more run time without destroying your battery.


In the low-wall PUPs and A-frames, the fridge is continuous run with manual adjustment of propane flow. A battery-powered wireless outdoor thermometer ($10 at Walmart) is a very useful tool for keeping fridge contents from freezing or getting too warm.


Final thought: don't let snow - especially wet snow - build up on roof or end roofs. The weight can break things.


things I have learned (most the hard way)
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Old 12-13-2016, 01:42 PM   #9
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winter camping in a pop-up

If you have any kind of heater/furnace, you will get a lot of condensation on the canvas! It is then very hard to dry it out before you fold it down in the winter! Mildew and mold will be your next problem. I have seen pop-ups in late November, when we had about a foot of snow over night and the roof collapsed! Not good!!!
If you have a place that you can dry it out after camping and there is no snow in the forecast, I would go camping!
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Old 12-13-2016, 02:15 PM   #10
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We did not camp with our Jayco pop up in winter but camped early March. Temps were still in the 30's at night and 40/50 days with the sun out.

Yeah condensation was a big problem. Plus when we folded up the camper we took it real slow and careful with the canvas. Our A/C-Heater did a good job and we used a small heater for the floor. Did not bother with the faucet/water. Had fun.
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Old 12-13-2016, 02:31 PM   #11
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A really bad idea.
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Old 12-13-2016, 03:05 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jb44588 View Post
Hi all Ė I have a 2016 Rockwood High Wall and I love it. I like to camp year round and I was wondering how cold is too cold for the canvas? What should I look out for when winter camping?
I have the camper winterized and donít use the water or sink in the winter.
Will you have electric hook up?
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Old 12-13-2016, 03:13 PM   #13
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Thanks everyone for all the great information. I believe I am now better prepared for winter camping. Iím hoping to get out on 1/7/17 (dang holidays are interfering with my camping). Iím lucky because the storage unit I have is large enough where I can open the camper up, so Iíll be able to dry it out after a trip.
Merry Christmas everyone and be safe in your travels
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Old 12-13-2016, 06:36 PM   #14
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I have always camped all year long, even in my popup. The Gizmos, reflectix, and reflective tarps all make it liveable. I would add one more thing, throw rugs/runners on the floor. We used an electric heater on its own extension cord to the power pedestal. With those things on the popup, we regularly had to turn the heat down, because we were too hot. Really, it is doable and you can be comfortable.

Good luck!
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Old 12-13-2016, 06:37 PM   #15
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Teaman here.

I used to own a Coleman popup and Winter camping is very doable here in Texas. One Winter I kept the unit erected all season in the driveway. I had electric out to the unit and used electric heaters mostly. But as others have said - Reflectex is your friend.

I bought two rolls at Lowes and cut with sissors to fit. I fit pieces together and taped joints with Duct tape. For the roof ends, I put the Reflectex panel on the top outside and used heavy duty clamps to hold the Reflectex to the canvas all around. I never had a problem with the storms. It all stayed secure. On the inside side walls, the fitted pieces were held up using big safety pins thru tabs made from Duct tape. I even made fitted pieces and placed under the mattresses on each end. This made all the difference in the world. With some thick carpet pieces on the floor. and electric heaters, it was as comfy as home. Even when snowing and freezing weather. I never had a big problem with condensation that I remember. I guess my popup sides and flimsy door let enough fresh air in anyway. Never had much snow on the roof here to cause a problem, but something to consider. Especially if the unit stays erected with no heat inside.
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Old 12-13-2016, 07:07 PM   #16
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If hook ups, an electric blanket under the mattress helps a lot. The heater runs a lot (make sure propane tank is full). Usually campgrounds turn off water when cold, so usually I filled up the FW tank (heater kept things warm enough). If campground does not turn off water, you will need a heated hose. Something to keep your head warm when you lay against the canvas wall. Warm boots for the midnight potty run (sandals just don't quite do it for me at 13 deg)
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Old 12-13-2016, 08:19 PM   #17
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I winter hunt and camp in mine here in Michigan, no issues. Just have enough ventilation and a good sleeping bag. I use a Kuiu mummy bag thats rated for -15 (f). My fresh water is winterized, don't use that at all. Carry water in 6 gallon plastic totes for cooking and drinking, bathing is optional but we are hunting, not going to a fancy beanery. Smelling good isn't in the plan anyway.

If I have to stow mine damp, when I get it home, I open it back up and let it sit for a few days to dry out. Never had an issue with mold or mildew.

I keep my furnace at 55 and I don't use the fridge under power. The ambient temp is enough to keep the food inside cold.

Everything is winterized so no toilet or shower or anything like that. No need anyway, A roll of TP and the woods is always close.

It's fun but use your head about it and you'll be fine. I have no idea what Gizmo's and Reflectix is. I do know that dressing for the cold and having a good sleeping bag is the way to go and be comfortable.

Been winter camping and hunting from a camper for years, in fact I looik forward to going. Much mire of a personal challenge that warm weather camping.... and fewer people too.
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Old 12-13-2016, 08:22 PM   #18
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No wonter camping this year. But last year, we did a few trip in the teens for several days.

Like many other have said, gizmos, reflective matl in windows, rugs on floor. Electric blankets under beds if you have electric.

Definite crack the vent and a window to help with condensation. You will still get some if you run the furnace. Which I would also keep about 50-55. A electric heater and Or a buddy heater, good sleeping bags, and we were good to go.

Also put some blanket over the door. Helps with the draft a bit. Oh and don't worry about the canvas or windows. Just don't push on it or try and scrape any Ice or frost off it. It will be brittle and tear easier.

If you don't mind the cold, you'll have fun
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Old 12-13-2016, 08:57 PM   #19
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Been there done that! Loved it! I was the official campground crazy.

I put blue rigid foam insulation and space blankets under the mattresses, then used reflectix in the windows/screen areas along with Popup Gizmos on the bunk ends. I did not have a furnace in mine. I used a Buddy heater on the dinette table fed from an outside LP tank with the hose led under the canvas. I didn't have too much trouble with condensation, but cracking a few vents is the easiest way to deal with it. I camped most of the winter with temps down into the teens a couple of nights. I also had a small electric cube heater that I hung from the roof support rod to keep the bunk end warm on the coldest nights. Good sleeping bag too. I had one bunk end closed off with Reflectix chip clipped to the privacy curtains.

Biggest problem I had was some rodent (squirrels?) chewing on my exposed LP line. I solved that by getting a piece of clear water hose that would slip over the fittings and protect the hose, they chewed on that some, but never made it through to the actual LP line.

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Old 12-13-2016, 09:23 PM   #20
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If you have electricity, invest in a heated mattress pad. We had one for the pop out on our old hybrid when our children were small and they work great! Not sure if you know what they are but imagine an electric blanket that you put UNDER you instead of on top of you. They are thermostatically controlled and cut in and out as needed. Our kids loved it and even used it during cool nights in the spring and summer. Definitely a must have for a pop up, especially during cool / cold weather.
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