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-   -   How do YOU season your cast iron ? (https://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f10/how-do-you-season-your-cast-iron-28130.html)

TURBS 08-21-2012 09:18 AM

How do YOU season your cast iron ?
 
Looking for your method .

OldCoot 08-21-2012 09:28 AM

Look at this. Seems like a pretty lengthy process. Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To

ependydad 08-21-2012 09:34 AM

If I recall correctly, the last time that we did this - we went to the meat stand in the farmer's market and got some fat (pig fat, maybe). We left the cast iron on the fire to get good and hot and then rubbed it around as much as we could.

TURBS 08-21-2012 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ependydad
If I recall correctly, the last time that we did this - we went to the meat stand in the farmer's market and got some fat (pig fat, maybe). We left the cast iron on the fire to get good and hot and then rubbed it around as much as we could.

If heard actual lard is good to use.

Mad4sax 08-21-2012 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by f1100turbo (Post 240461)
Looking for your method .

I have several cast iron pans I use all the time. You could fry an egg in them and it won't stick.

What I do is cover them with a thin layer of Crisco (the white stuff in a can). I put them on the back part of my grill and just leave them as I grill several times. I will re-apply the crisco a couple of times.

I do have a large grill and grill more than most, so it doesn't take long for the seasoning process.

TURBS 08-21-2012 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mad4sax

I have several cast iron pans I use all the time. You could fry an egg in them and it won't stick.

What I do is cover them with a thin layer of Crisco (the white stuff in a can). I put them on the back part of my grill and just leave them as I grill several times. I will re-apply the crisco a couple of times.

I do have a large grill and grill more than most, so it doesn't take long for the seasoning process.

My last 8 " pan I seasoned on my grill upside down . Used olive oil.
Is that what your referring to ?
I'm thinking lard is the answer.

trudinator 08-21-2012 10:33 AM

Here's how we do it - and we own three dutch ovens, 5 frying pans, a griddle and a small oval frying pan.

Wash your new cast iron items in hot soapy water to remove any oils from manufacturing. Dry thoroughly. Coat the entire surface - inside and out - with a good coat of vegetable oil. Dont' forget your cover! Turn your gas grill on and set your items inside your grill and leave them there for a couple of hours. Periodically check your items and add more il if you see any dry spots. When you're done, let everything cool, then wipe down with a cloth or paper towel. You could also do this in your oven, but be forwarned - it will get smoky in your house!!

If you still have problems with foods sticking, repeat this process. I NEVER use soap of any kind in my cast iron after seasoning. Simply wipe it out or if you have something sticky and gooey, I add water to the pan and simmer until the gunk comes off. Then dump it out, wipe it out and you're done!

To protect your cast iron, and to keep it seasoned, I use commercial Cast Iron Conditioner once in a while, especially when stowing these items in the fall. I don't use any type of vegetable oil for this process, as it can turn rancid and sticky. Only Cast Iron Conditioner. You can find it at Cabela's or any good sporting goods store.

I grew up using cast iron and if it weren't so heavy, and if I weren't so paranoid of scratching my glass cooktop, I'd use it every day at home.

TURBS 08-21-2012 10:38 AM

Pan or pot right side up or upside down ?
High med or low heat?

donn 08-21-2012 10:54 AM

Lots of oil for a really long time on medium/high heat. You don't want the oil to smoke, but you do want the CI hot as blazes to absorb the oil.

latner 08-21-2012 11:14 AM

Since I only have one DO that I use for breakfast to desert, I line mine with non-stick aluminum foil...easy clean-up and no cross contamination of flavors.

trudinator 08-21-2012 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by latner (Post 240543)
Since I only have one DO that I use for breakfast to desert, I line mine with non-stick aluminum foil...easy clean-up and no cross contamination of flavors.

You're missing the whole point of using cast iron. Did you know you get an entire days worth of iron from just one meal in cast iron? And nothing can beat the flavor, nor the versatility of a well-seasoned cast iron pan or DO. There is no cross contamination of flavors from any of my cast iron.

With proper care these pans will last you a lifetime. We recently bought a Griswold (prized by collectors!) cast iron fry pan at a thrift shop for $8 and it was the color of a well-worn penny. A lot of soap, steel wool, elbow grease and seasoning brought this pan back to life.

Almost forgot to mention - deep frying in your frying pan or DO is an excellent way to use a new pan after seasoning!

TURBS 08-21-2012 03:05 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by trudinator

You're missing the whole point of using cast iron. Did you know you get an entire days worth of iron from just one meal in cast iron? And nothing can beat the flavor, nor the versatility of a well-seasoned cast iron pan or DO. There is no cross contamination of flavors from any of my cast iron.

With proper care these pans will last you a lifetime. We recently bought a Griswold (prized by collectors!) cast iron fry pan at a thrift shop for $8 and it was the color of a well-worn penny. A lot of soap, steel wool, elbow grease and seasoning brought this pan back to life.

Almost forgot to mention - deep frying in your frying pan or DO is an excellent way to use a new pan after seasoning!

Just finished sand blasting mine from years of neglect.
Ready to start seasoning.


Attachment 18456

4bnabird 08-23-2012 10:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trudinator (Post 240682)

With proper care these pans will last you a lifetime. We recently bought a Griswold (prized by collectors!) cast iron fry pan at a thrift shop for $8 and it was the color of a well-worn penny. A lot of soap, steel wool, elbow grease and seasoning brought this pan back to life.


Ditto! My husband picked up an early edition Wagner Sydney O at a garage sale for $10. It's trademark is from 1891 to 1914. It was in really good shape with some grease baked on the side of it. Just a little scraping and WOW! It's as slick as ice!!! It is my go to frying pan for almost everything. The one household piece that I actually tote back and forth from the house to the camper. :thumbsup:

BTW dear husband didn't even know what kind of a skillet he brought home. He was just thinking "hey it's cast iron". I don't think the guy realized it too because he even came down on his price too.

great white 08-25-2012 09:07 AM

Campfire + lots of bacon = a well seasoned cast iron pan and very happy dogs!

;)

Earth Station 08-25-2012 09:55 AM

We consistently use cast iron to cook..... Stored in a Rubbermaid tote with microfiber cloths to separate. We use mineral oil to season. It never gets sticky at all.

Freds342 09-02-2012 12:54 PM

I've been using PAM for over 20 years on all my Cast Iron. Never touch with soap; just water if something like carnitas or potatoes get stuck.

Kf4mnc 09-02-2012 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trudinator (Post 240515)
Here's how we do it - and we own three dutch ovens, 5 frying pans, a griddle and a small oval frying pan.

Wash your new cast iron items in hot soapy water to remove any oils from manufacturing. Dry thoroughly. Coat the entire surface - inside and out - with a good coat of vegetable oil. Dont' forget your cover! Turn your gas grill on and set your items inside your grill and leave them there for a couple of hours. Periodically check your items and add more il if you see any dry spots. When you're done, let everything cool, then wipe down with a cloth or paper towel. You could also do this in your oven, but be forwarned - it will get smoky in your house!!

If you still have problems with foods sticking, repeat this process. I NEVER use soap of any kind in my cast iron after seasoning. Simply wipe it out or if you have something sticky and gooey, I add water to the pan and simmer until the gunk comes off. Then dump it out, wipe it out and you're done!

To protect your cast iron, and to keep it seasoned, I use commercial Cast Iron Conditioner once in a while, especially when stowing these items in the fall. I don't use any type of vegetable oil for this process, as it can turn rancid and sticky. Only Cast Iron Conditioner. You can find it at Cabela's or any good sporting goods store.

I grew up using cast iron and if it weren't so heavy, and if I weren't so paranoid of scratching my glass cooktop, I'd use it every day at home.

Soap?!?!? I've never used soap on cast iron! If a Brillo pad doesn't take it off then it's staying! Getting soap out of cast iron is a chore!

I just heat it up and slather it with Cisco. I do this multiple times until it stops obsorbing the oil.

Properly seasoned cast iron should come clean very easy!

Iggy 09-02-2012 04:22 PM

How do you season cast iron pan?

With a little salt and pepper before eating. :roflblack:

WWTTA 09-02-2012 05:37 PM

Wash in hot water with brush....no soap!.....Dry completely....coat with Crisco inside and out....place in a cool to moderate oven (250 to 300 degrees) for three to four hours or place in hot oven (400 to 450 degrees) for an hour...there should be no dry looking spots. Should NOT smoke!!! Turn oven off and let cool naturally. When cool to the touch, wipe off and out with paper towels or old/clean dish towel to remove excess oil. Seasoning should last until it wears off due to certain acidic foods or washing with detergent. If there is "cross contamination of foods" taste, there is too much oil on the pan and it is rancid...time to clean and re-season. I don't cook with Crisco or use it in any recipes...it isn't really "food"....but keep a small can on hand strictly for cast iron seasoning. If the cast iron is new, it may need a small amount of fat each time you cook...we use olive oil, until the pan is fully seasoned (especially if not left in the heat long enough during seasoning), but if you use it, it won't take long :).

trudinator 09-03-2012 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kf4mnc

Soap?!?!? I've never used soap on cast iron! If a Brillo pad doesn't take it off then it's staying! Getting soap out of cast iron is a chore!

I just heat it up and slather it with Cisco. I do this multiple times until it stops obsorbing the oil.

Properly seasoned cast iron should come clean very easy!

Only use soap when brand new to remove the oils from manufacturing, which are not food safe.


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